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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Salado in Bell County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

Boles-Aiken Log Cabin

 
 
Boles-Aiken Log Cabin Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By James Hulse, August 4, 2022
1. Boles-Aiken Log Cabin Marker
Inscription.  The cabin discovered in 1986 inside a house being torn down on Center Circle in Salado may have been a stage stop, a resting place for drivers and horses, a post office, a school, before becoming hidden walls in a residence. Research led by Salado Historical Society and the Texas Historical Commission provided few fragments. Salado Historical Society rescued, restored, and continues to maintain the cabin built during the 1850's Bowles (family spelling) ownership or earlier squatter's rights of the family.

Benjamin Bowles, born 1785, married 1810, Elizabeth Jefferies, in Kentucky, moved to Missouri, and finally, in 1827, to Texas with 5 daughters, 2 sons, and their Uncle Henry Smith, first American Governor of Texas, 1835. Oral family tradition ties Benjamin Bowles to Scot-Cherokee Chief Bowles (1756-1839), who was killed in Republic of Texas Battle of Neches.

With Brazoria and Bastrop counties choice locations, the Lost Pines section of Bastrop was site of a league of land claimed by Benjamin Bowles in 1831 before his untimely death in 1832, contributed to the loss of the land. The site of the cabin, a labor of land in
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Salado, 1850, last land for heirs of Bowles, was purchased from them, 1859-60 by Herman Aiken who, in the last months of his life, transferred one-half of it to Salado College Trustees and surveyed for sale the other half for town lots, a joint project for college and town initiated by the 1859 gift of 100 acres by Elijah Sterling Clack Robertson.
 
Erected 2012 by Estate of Julia Whatley Kemp (1909-2008) G.G. Granddaughter of Benjamin Bowles.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in this topic list: Notable Buildings. A significant historical year for this entry is 1986.
 
Location. 30° 57.075′ N, 97° 32.063′ W. Marker is in Salado, Texas, in Bell County. Marker is on Van Bibber Road, 0.1 miles east of North Main Street (Farm to Market Road 2268), on the left when traveling east. The marker is located in a small historical park managed by the Salado Historical Society. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 101 Van Bibber Road, Salado TX 76571, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The Writer's Cabin (a few steps from this marker); Reverend Moses Hampton Denman (a few steps from this marker); Hamblen-Aiken Cemetery (a few steps from this marker); M. H. Denman Cabin (a few steps from this marker); In Honor of Our Veterans (about
Boles-Aiken Log Cabin Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By James Hulse, August 4, 2022
2. Boles-Aiken Log Cabin Marker
400 feet away, measured in a direct line); Alice Gray Hamblen (about 400 feet away); W.R. Berry Carriage House (about 600 feet away); The Hutchens House (about 700 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Salado.
 
Also see . . .  Neches, Battle of the. Texas State Historical Association
The battle of the Neches, fought on July 15 and 16, 1839, was the principal engagement of the Cherokee War, a conflict that began when President Mirabeau B. Lamar announced that the time had come for an “exterminating war” on Texas Indians. Under Lamar’s leadership, the Republic refused to recognize earlier treaties with the Cherokees who lived in East Texas and, after accusing the Indians of planning to join Mexico in an insurrection, sent troops commanded by Gen. Thomas J. Rusk to occupy Indian lands. The Cherokee leader, Chief Bowl (Duwali) led an evacuation of their main town, but as the Indians moved north they were attacked a few miles west of present-day Tyler at dusk on July 15.
(Submitted on August 7, 2022, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas.) 
 
The view of the Boles-Aiken Log Cabin from the Civic Center parking lot image. Click for full size.
Photographed By James Hulse, August 4, 2022
3. The view of the Boles-Aiken Log Cabin from the Civic Center parking lot
The Boles-Aiken Log Cabin and Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By James Hulse, August 4, 2022
4. The Boles-Aiken Log Cabin and Marker
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on August 7, 2022. It was originally submitted on August 6, 2022, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas. This page has been viewed 216 times since then and 38 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on August 7, 2022, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas.

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May. 18, 2024