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Georgetown in Northwest Washington in Washington, District of Columbia — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Holy Trinity Parish

1790

 
 
Holy Trinity Parish Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Devry Becker Jones (CC0), December 5, 2022
1. Holy Trinity Parish Marker
Inscription.  
Founded by the Jesuit community of George-town College.

This church was first dedicated 15 June 1851. Restored and re-dedicated 23 September 1979

The original church, to the rear, was dedicated 1792 and remains the oldest standing church in the District of Columbia
 
Erected 1979 by Holy Trinity Church.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Churches & ReligionNotable Buildings. A significant historical date for this entry is June 15, 1851.
 
Location. 38° 54.426′ N, 77° 4.213′ W. Marker is in Northwest Washington in Washington, District of Columbia. It is in Georgetown. Marker is on 36th Street Northwest north of N Street Northwest, on the left when traveling south. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 1315 36th Street Northwest, Washington DC 20057, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. John Fitzgerald Kennedy (a few steps from this marker); The Black House (within shouting distance of this marker); La Casa Latina (within shouting distance of this marker); Holy Hill (within
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shouting distance of this marker); Dedicated to the Memory (within shouting distance of this marker); Holy Trinity Church (within shouting distance of this marker); Robert and Bernice Wagner Alumni House 2005 (within shouting distance of this marker); America's Oldest Catholic University (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Northwest Washington.
 
Also see . . .  Holy Trinity Parish. (PDF) HABS Data Sheet, Library of Congress (Submitted on September 4, 2016, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.) 
 
Additional commentary.
1. During the Civil War
"Present Church - Holy Trinity Church was one of the seven buildings in Georgetown that were converted into hospitals during the Civil War. Military guards, under the command of Captain Strong of Pennsylvania, were put in charge of the entire church property. Temporary flooring was built over the pews and sanctuary. (During the Army occupation the old church on First (N) Street was used for worshipers.) The church was restored to its original condition after the war,
Holy Trinity Parish Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Richard E. Miller, August 23, 2009
2. Holy Trinity Parish Marker
This is a photo of the marker prior to its restoration.
and received compensation from the government for its use and for repairs." -- HABS
    — Submitted September 4, 2016, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.

 
Additional keywords. Roman Catholicism
 
Holy Trinity Parrish image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Richard E. Miller, August 23, 2009
3. Holy Trinity Parrish
Marker is on the fence, south of the church entrance in the shadows, lower right.
Holy Trinity Parish Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Allen C. Browne, September 3, 2016
4. Holy Trinity Parish Marker
Stained Glass Window, The Trinity image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Allen C. Browne, September 3, 2016
5. Stained Glass Window, The Trinity
Pater non est Spiritus Sanctu non est Filius non est Pater

Pater est Deus, Spiritus Santus est Deus, Filius est Deus
HABS Plaque image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Allen C. Browne, September 3, 2016
6. HABS Plaque
This Structure has been
Recorded by the
Historical American
Building Survey

of the United States Department
of the Interior for its archives
at the Library of Congress
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on January 30, 2023. It was originally submitted on September 1, 2009, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland. This page has been viewed 1,063 times since then and 13 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on December 5, 2022, by Devry Becker Jones of Washington, District of Columbia.   2, 3. submitted on September 1, 2009, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.   4, 5. submitted on September 3, 2016, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.   6. submitted on September 4, 2016, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.

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Apr. 12, 2024