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Greater South River City in Austin in Travis County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

Texas School for the Deaf

 
 
Texas School for the Deaf Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Keith Peterson, November 25, 2007
1. Texas School for the Deaf Marker
Inscription.  

In 1856, the Texas Legislature established the Texas Deaf and Dumb Asylum, which became the Texas School for the Deaf (TSD). Gov. Elisha M. Pease appointed a board of trustees, which rented land at this site. By January 1, 1857, the first day of school, no students had arrived, but by summer of that year, 11 students were enrolled, including Emily Lewis, whose account of the school's early history portrays a life of hard work and self-sufficiency under school matron Josephine Snyder.

New Yorker Jacob van Nostrand, with 19 years of deaf education, became the school's first superintendent in 1857. In 1875-76, he returned to New York, and Gov. Richard Coke appointed Gen. Henry McCulloch as superintendent. McCulloch's leadership caused the faculty and staff, including then-principal Emily Lewis, to leave. During the tenure of the next superintendent, Col. John Salmon "Rip" Ford, Lewis returned to the staff, where she stayed until her retirement in 1914. In 1887, the state created what became the Texas Blind, Deaf and Orphan School, which served non-white students. From integration of the schools in 1965 until 2002, its campus in
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east Austin remained part of TSD's facilities.

The 20th century brought many changes to the campus facilities, administration and curriculum, including status as an independent school district. Newsletters and yearbooks document an active sports program over the school's long history, and alumni and staff fondly recall the long-standing, twin-towered main building, and the significant leaders who provided support and education to the school's students and families.
 
Erected 2006 by Texas Historical Commission. (Marker Number 13458.)
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in this topic list: Education. A significant historical month for this entry is January 1939.
 
Location. 30° 15.267′ N, 97° 44.877′ W. Marker is in Austin, Texas, in Travis County. It is in Greater South River City. Marker is on Congress Avenue south of East Riverside Drive, on the right when traveling south. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 1102 S Congress Avenue, Austin TX 78704, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The Academy (approx. 0.3 miles away); The “Austin Statesman” (approx. 0.4 miles away); Site of the Headquarters of the United States Army for 5th Military District (approx. 0.6 miles away); Grinninger Fence (approx. 0.6 miles away); Robert S. Stanley House
Texas School for the Deaf Entrance Gate image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Keith Peterson, November 25, 2007
2. Texas School for the Deaf Entrance Gate
(approx. 0.6 miles away); Congress Avenue (approx. 0.6 miles away); Ollie O. Norwood Estate (approx. 0.7 miles away); Town Lake Park Alliance (approx. ¾ mile away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Austin.
 
Also see . . .  Texas School for the Deaf. (Submitted on December 19, 2009, by Keith Peterson of Cedar Park, Texas.)
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on February 1, 2023. It was originally submitted on December 18, 2009, by Keith Peterson of Cedar Park, Texas. This page has been viewed 2,071 times since then and 88 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on December 18, 2009, by Keith Peterson of Cedar Park, Texas.   2. submitted on December 19, 2009, by Keith Peterson of Cedar Park, Texas. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
 
Editor’s want-list for this marker. A clear, complete, close-up photo of the marker. • A wide view of the marker and the surrounding area in context. • Can you help?

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Jul. 23, 2024