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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”

Charleston in Charleston County, South Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Clark Mills Studio

 
 
Clark Mills Studio Marker, Studio of self-taught sculptor Clark Mills image. Click for full size.
By Michael Sean Nix, February 13, 2010
1. Clark Mills Studio Marker, Studio of self-taught sculptor Clark Mills
National Historic Landmark #66000703
Inscription.  

Clark Mills Studio
has been designated a
Registered National
Historic Landmark
under the provisions of the
Historic Sites Act of August 21, 1935.
This site possesses exceptional value
in commemorating or illustrating
the history of the United States
U.S. Department of the Interior
National Park Service
1966

 
Erected 1966 by U.S. Department of the Interior National Park Service.
 
Topics and series. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Arts, Letters, MusicNotable Buildings. In addition, it is included in the National Historic Landmarks series list.
 
Location. 32° 46.59′ N, 79° 55.773′ W. Marker is in Charleston, South Carolina, in Charleston County. Marker is on Broad Street 0.1 miles west of Church Street, on the right when traveling east. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 51 Broad Street, Charleston SC 29401, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Old Bank Building (a few steps from this marker); The Confederate Home
Clark Mills Studio image. Click for full size.
By Michael Sean Nix, February 13, 2010
2. Clark Mills Studio
(within shouting distance of this marker); Shepheard's Tavern (within shouting distance of this marker); Ancient and Accepted Scottish Rite of Freemasonry / Solomon's Lodge No. 1 (within shouting distance of this marker); The Society of the Cincinnati of the State of South Carolina (within shouting distance of this marker); The Grand Lodge of Ancient Freemasons of South Carolina (within shouting distance of this marker); Daniel Ravenel II House (within shouting distance of this marker); William A. Giles (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Charleston.
 
Also see . . .
1. Wikipedia entry for Clark Mills Studio. (Submitted on February 14, 2010, by Michael Sean Nix of Spartanburg, South Carolina.)
2. Wikipedia entry for Clark Mills the sculptor. (Submitted on February 14, 2010, by Michael Sean Nix of Spartanburg, South Carolina.)
3. South Carolina Department of Archives and History. (Submitted on February 14, 2010, by Michael Sean Nix of Spartanburg, South Carolina.)
4. Clark Mills Studio. National Register Form
“Clark Mills (1815-1883) was a self-taught sculptor who succeeded in creating the first equestrian statue cast in the United States (1852). It was that of Major Andrew Jackson,
Clark Mills' Equestrian Statue of Andrew Jackson in Lafayette Square, Washington, DC image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, August 18, 2012
3. Clark Mills' Equestrian Statue of Andrew Jackson in Lafayette Square, Washington, DC
hero of the Battle of New Orleans (1814), which stands today in LaFayette Square, Washington, B.C. More important than the aesthetic value of his work however, which is minor, Mills' contribution as an engineer is unsurpassed. He pioneered new techniques in the casting of bronze, built his own foundry, and with a great determination succeeded in an area where he had little experience, His mastery of the dynamics of the apparently unbalanced Jackson Statue is a real tribute to the ingenuity of this man who solved a problem which had confounded many great artists and engineers before him.” (Submitted on October 7, 2019, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.) 
 
Clark Mills' Statue of Freedom atop the Capitol Dome in Washington, DC image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, August 18, 2012
4. Clark Mills' Statue of Freedom atop the Capitol Dome in Washington, DC
Clark Mills' Grave in Glenwood Cemetery, Washington, DC image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, October 7, 2019
5. Clark Mills' Grave in Glenwood Cemetery, Washington, DC

Clark Mills
Sculptor
MDCCCXV - MDCCCLXXXIII
Creator of the first self-
balanced rampant equestrian
statue in the world
erected in Lafayette Park
at Washington to General
Andrew Jackson
in 1848
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on October 8, 2019. It was originally submitted on February 14, 2010, by Michael Sean Nix of Spartanburg, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 953 times since then and 43 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on February 14, 2010, by Michael Sean Nix of Spartanburg, South Carolina.   3, 4, 5. submitted on October 7, 2019, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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Aug. 8, 2020