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Harriman in Orange County, New York — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

First MIA Flag

 
 
First MIA Flag Marker image. Click for full size.
By Clifton Patrick, November 6, 2009
1. First MIA Flag Marker
Inscription.  First MIA Flag
On Nov. 10, 1974 the nation’s first MIA banner and flag pole was dedicated under a resolution conceived by Commander Thomas C. Bushing.
 
Erected by American Legion Mulligan-Eden Post 1573.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: MilitaryWar, Vietnam.
 
Location. 41° 18.582′ N, 74° 9.016′ W. Marker is in Harriman, New York, in Orange County. Marker is at the intersection of South Main Street and Grove Street when traveling north on South Main Street. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 1 South Main St, Harriman NY 10926, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 3 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Harriman (a few steps from this marker); First Train Order Transmitted by Telegraph (approx. Ľ mile away); First Church (approx. 1.6 miles away); American Heroes (approx. 1.9 miles away); Reynolds House (approx. 2 miles away); Monroe Race Track (approx. 2.1 miles away); Methodist Church (approx. 2.1 miles away); McGarrah’s Inn (approx. 2.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Harriman.
 
Also see . . .
First MIA Flag Marker at Memorial Park in Harriman, NY image. Click for full size.
By Nick Begley, March 13, 2010
2. First MIA Flag Marker at Memorial Park in Harriman, NY
 Wikipedia Entry for Vietnam War POW/MIA issue. Excerpt:
As of December 21, 2018, according to the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency, the number of U.S. military and civilian personnel still unaccounted for from the Vietnam War is 1,592.
(Submitted on October 5, 2019.) 
 
Additional comments.
1. About the POW/MIA Flag
Google ‘first POW/MIA flag’ and you’ll find out when it was first conceived (1971), created and adopted (1972), first flown at the White House (1982) and in the U.S. Capitol Rotunda (1989), and when Congress recognized it officially (1990). From Wikipedia:
Then National League of Families of American Prisoners and Missing in Southeast Asia President and POW wife Evelyn Grubb oversaw the development of the now-famous National League of Families' POW/MIA flag in the early 1970s. The flag’s original design by military wife Haydn Anthony, was passed on to an ad agency and slightly modified by employee Newt Heisley, to represent America’s missing men. The original design showed a POW crouched in a cage rather than the head of a POW now shown. Evelyn Grubb was then also a driving force in gaining the flags adoption by the military, the U.S. Postal Service and other federal service agencies.
MIA Flag Flies over Memorial Park in Harriman, NY image. Click for full size.
By Clifton Patrick, November 6, 2009
3. MIA Flag Flies over Memorial Park in Harriman, NY
Eventually the flag became widely popular and adoption of its use began to spread on its own, as the flag became a national symbol of Vietnam war remembrance. The flag, with the now widely recognized “You Are Not Forgotten, POW/MIA” logo is still flown in front of all U.S. post offices, all major U.S. military installations, and most fire stations, police stations, many state level agencies and also most veterans organizations chapters across the United States today, and is almost always present at most local and national veterans events in the United States. The flag is consequently visible to millions of Americans on a daily basis.
    — Submitted October 5, 2019, by J. J. Prats of Powell, Ohio.
 
First MIA Flag image. Click for full size.
By Nick Begley, March 13, 2010
4. First MIA Flag
Close-up of memorial rock image. Click for full size.
By Nick Begley, March 13, 2010
5. Close-up of memorial rock
The plaque reads:
In Memoriam
In wars grim hours that tested all
among the first they heard the call
in many lands far flung and wide
they bravely fought and bravely died
Dedicated to all our veterans of all our wars
A grateful village
Harriman, New York
Flag of the National League of Families of American Prisoners and Missing in Southeast Asia image. Click for full size.
Designed by Hayden Anthony and Newt Heisley, 1972
6. Flag of the National League of Families of American Prisoners and Missing in Southeast Asia
The National League of Families of American Prisoners and Missing in Southeast Asia is a non-profit organization that is concerned with the Vietnam War POW/MIA issue.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on October 5, 2019. It was originally submitted on November 8, 2009, by Clifton Patrick of Chester, NY, United States. This page has been viewed 949 times since then and 100 times this year. Last updated on March 17, 2010, by Nick Begley of Chester, New York. It was the Marker of the Week October 6, 2019. Photos:   1. submitted on November 8, 2009, by Clifton Patrick of Chester, NY, United States.   2. submitted on March 16, 2010, by Nick Begley of Chester, New York.   3. submitted on November 8, 2009, by Clifton Patrick of Chester, NY, United States.   4, 5. submitted on March 16, 2010, by Nick Begley of Chester, New York.   6. submitted on October 5, 2019, by J. J. Prats of Powell, Ohio. • Kevin W. was the editor who published this page.
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