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Aiken in Aiken County, South Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

First Presbyterian Church of Aiken

 
 
First Presbyterian Church of Aiken Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Mike Stroud, 2010
1. First Presbyterian Church of Aiken Marker
Inscription.  
This church, founded in 1858 with 14 charter members and W. Peronneau Finley and John D. Legare as elders, first met in the Aiken Town Hall on Laurens St. Its first permanent sanctuary, a frame building designed by Charleston architect Edward Brickell White, was completed and dedicated in 1859. It stood at the corner of Laurens Street and Railroad (now Park) Avenue until it was demolished in 1924.

(Reverse text):
The second sanctuary, a Classical Revival brick building, was designed by Aiken architect Willis Irvin and served the congregation until 1969. The church membership tripled during the Aiken population boom of the the 1950s and was renamed First Presbyterian Church of Aiken in 1959. The present sanctuary, designed by the firm of Hallman and Weems, was built here in 1968-68 and dedicated in 1969.
 
Erected 2008 by The Congregation. (Marker Number 2-40.)
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in this topic list: Churches & Religion. A significant historical year for this entry is 1858.
 
Location. 33° 33.819′ N, 81° 43.272′ 
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W. Marker is in Aiken, South Carolina, in Aiken County. Marker is on Barnwell Avenue Northwest near Laurens Street, NW (State Road 19), on the right when traveling west. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 224 Barnwell Avenue Northwest, Aiken SC 29801, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 10 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The Augusta And Aiken Railway (within shouting distance of this marker); Author Jeff Scott (about 500 feet away, measured in a direct line); Aiken Vietnam War Monument (about 600 feet away); St. John's Methodist Church (approx. 0.2 miles away); Adath Yeshurun Synagogue (approx. 0.2 miles away); H. Odell Weeks (approx. 0.2 miles away); 1953 Gas Explosion (approx. 0.2 miles away); Original Survey of Aiken (approx. 0.2 miles away); Aiken's Jewish Merchants (approx. 0.2 miles away); Battle of Aiken (approx. ¼ mile away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Aiken.
 
Also see . . .
1. First Presbyterian Church of Aiken. Official website of the First Presbyterian Church of Aiken. (Submitted on January 5, 2011, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

2. Edward Brickell White. Edward Brickell White, also known as E.B. White, was an American architect. (Submitted on January 5, 2011, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 
 
First Presbyterian Church of Aiken Marker, reverse side image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Mike Stroud, March 14, 2010
2. First Presbyterian Church of Aiken Marker, reverse side
First Presbyterian Church of Aiken and Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Mike Stroud, March 14, 2010
3. First Presbyterian Church of Aiken and Marker
First Presbyterian Church of Aiken Marker, looking west along Barnwell Avenue image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Mike Stroud, March 14, 2010
4. First Presbyterian Church of Aiken Marker, looking west along Barnwell Avenue
First Presbyterian Church of Aiken Marker, looking east along Barnwell Avenue image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Mike Stroud, March 14, 2010
5. First Presbyterian Church of Aiken Marker, looking east along Barnwell Avenue
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. It was originally submitted on March 29, 2010, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 1,364 times since then and 26 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on March 29, 2010, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.

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Apr. 25, 2024