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Dupont Circle in Northwest Washington in Washington, District of Columbia — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

John Witherspoon

1722 Scotland – Princeton 1794

 
 
John Witherspoon Monument image. Click for full size.
Photographed By J. J. Prats, April 3, 2010
1. John Witherspoon Monument
Inscription.  
Signer of the Declaration of Independence.

Presbyterian Minister.

“For my own part, of property I have some reputation more that reputation staked. That property is pledged on the issue of this contest: and although these gray hairs must soon descend into the sepulchre, I would infinitely rather that they descend thither by the hand of the executioner than desert at this crisis the sacred cause of my country.”
 
Erected 1908 by The Witherspoon Memorial Association.
 
Topics and series. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Churches & ReligionPatriots & PatriotismWar, US Revolutionary. In addition, it is included in the DC, American Revolution Statuary, and the Signers of the Declaration of Independence series lists.
 
Location. 38° 54.43′ N, 77° 2.507′ W. Marker is in Northwest Washington in Washington, District of Columbia. It is in Dupont Circle. Marker is at the intersection of Connecticut Avenue Northwest and N Street Northwest
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, on the right when traveling north on Connecticut Avenue Northwest. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 1301 Connecticut Avenue Northwest, Washington DC 20036, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The National Presbyterian Church (within shouting distance of this marker); Theodore Roosevelt (within shouting distance of this marker); In Memory of Henry Martyn Robert (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Tabard Inn (about 500 feet away); General Federation of Women’s Clubs (about 600 feet away); The Paul and Phyllis Nitze Building (about 600 feet away); "Single Form" (about 600 feet away); The Cathedral of St. Matthew the Apostle (about 600 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Northwest Washington.
 
Also see . . .
1. Sculpture entry at the Smithsonian’s Art Inventory Catalog. “John Witherspoon (1722-1794), a Presbyterian clergyman, immigrated to the United States from Scotland and went on to become a leader in the Presbyterian Church and later president of the College of New Jersey at Princeton (Princeton University). In 1774 he became involved in American politics and served in the Second Continental Congress during the Revolutionary War. He signed the Declaration of Independence and helped to ratify the Federal Constitution in 1787.

“This sculpture was erected by the Witherspoon Memorial Association organized by Dr. George Graham, pastor of the National Presbyterian Church. Sculpture was authorized by an act of Congress on May 29, 1908. The sculpture was installed in front of the National Presbyterian Church until the church was torn down in 1966. The sculpture was
“Signer of the Declaration of Independence” image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Tom Fuchs, April 3, 2010
2. “Signer of the Declaration of Independence”
then installed in its present site, although members of the National Presbyterian Church have lobbied to relocate the sculpture to the front of their new church on Nebraska Avenue, N.W. The opposition to the relocation notes that there must be an act of Congress to move the sculpture.” (Submitted on April 10, 2010, by J. J. Prats of Powell, Ohio.) 

2. John Witherspoon and the Founding of the American Republic. 2005 book by Jeffry H. Morrison on Amazon.com. “Sometime during the debates on July 1 and 2, 1776, a member of the conservative faction ... argued that the country at large was not yet ripe for independence. Witherspoon shot back that in his judgement the colonies were not only ripe for independence but also ‘in danger of becoming rotten for the want of it.’ By so replying, he helped prod Congress towards passing Richard Henry Lee’s Resolution for Independence on July 2, and the Declaration of Independence two days later.” (Submitted on April 10, 2010, by J. J. Prats of Powell, Ohio.) This website may earn income if you use this link to make a purchase on Amazon.com. 
 
“Presbyterian Minister” image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Tom Fuchs, April 3, 2010
3. “Presbyterian Minister”
John Witherspoon Quote image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Tom Fuchs, April 3, 2010
4. John Witherspoon Quote
John Witherspoon Monument image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Tom Fuchs, April 3, 2010
5. John Witherspoon Monument
Doctor John Witherspoon Sculpture image. Click for full size.
Photographed By J. J. Prats, April 3, 2010
6. Doctor John Witherspoon Sculpture
Bronze by William Couper (1853–1942) is 8 feet tall on a 9 foot base was erected in 1966 at this site. It was originally erected in 1908 further south on Connecticut Avenue at L Street, where the National Presbyterian Church once stood.
Doctor John Witherspoon (1722–1794) image. Click for full size.
Photographed By J. J. Prats, April 3, 2010
7. Doctor John Witherspoon (1722–1794)
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on January 30, 2023. It was originally submitted on April 4, 2010, by Tom Fuchs of Greenbelt, Maryland. This page has been viewed 1,686 times since then and 20 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on April 10, 2010, by J. J. Prats of Powell, Ohio.   2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on April 4, 2010, by Tom Fuchs of Greenbelt, Maryland.   6, 7. submitted on April 10, 2010, by J. J. Prats of Powell, Ohio. • J. J. Prats was the editor who published this page.

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Apr. 13, 2024