Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”

Near Pasco in Franklin County, Washington — The American West (Northwest)
 

Ainsworth

 
 
Ainsworth Marker image. Click for full size.
By Paul Crumlish, July 31, 2010
1. Ainsworth Marker
Inscription.  One of the most colorful of the early Northwest railroad towns once existed near junction of the Snake and Columbia Rivers. Ainsworth was founded, 1879, when the railroad bridge was building over the Snake River.
In its heyday it was a wild, lusty town, noted for brawls, gun fights and hangings. For a while a vital cog in the Northern Pacific Railroad’s extension to Puget Sound. It slowly sank into oblivion after opening of the bridge to traffic in 1884.
The town was named for John C. Ainsworth, a prominent figure in transportation circles of the early Northwest.
 
Erected by Washington State Highway Commission in cooperation with the State Parks and Recreation Commission. (Marker Number 37.)
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Railroads & StreetcarsSettlements & Settlers.
 
Location. 46° 13.092′ N, 119° 1.624′ W. Marker is near Pasco, Washington, in Franklin County. Marker can be reached from the intersection of Sacajawea Park Road and U.S. 12, on
Wide view of the Ainsworth Marker image. Click for full size.
By Paul Crumlish, July 31, 2010
2. Wide view of the Ainsworth Marker
Near the Sacajawea State Park, the Ainsworth marker (right) stands next to the Sacagawea marker.
the left when traveling east. The marker is located in the middle of a scenic parking area on the left hand side of Sacajawea Park Road just south of US-12. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Pasco WA 99301, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 6 other markers are within 13 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Sacagawea (here, next to this marker); Lewis and Clark Trail (approx. 0.7 miles away); Here Stood Fort Nez Perce (approx. 10.8 miles away); Fort Nez Percés / Fort Walla Walla (approx. 10.8 miles away); Fort Walla Walla (approx. 10.8 miles away); The History of Wallula (approx. 12.2 miles away).
 
Also see . . .  Washington Secretary of State: A History of Franklin County. (Submitted on August 17, 2010, by PaulwC3 of Northern, Virginia.)
 
Site of the Ainsworth ghost town image. Click for full size.
By Paul Crumlish, July 31, 2010
3. Site of the Ainsworth ghost town
Today Ainsworth is the site of Sacajawea State Park and limited commercial development. The railroad line, from the Snake River bridge, runs through the foreground.
Today's Snake River Railroad Bridge image. Click for full size.
By Paul Crumlish, July 31, 2010
4. Today's Snake River Railroad Bridge
Located at the confluence of the Snake and Columbia Rivers, the bridge today follows the same route as the original 1884 railroad bridge.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on January 27, 2020. It was originally submitted on August 17, 2010, by PaulwC3 of Northern, Virginia. This page has been viewed 1,002 times since then and 15 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on August 17, 2010, by PaulwC3 of Northern, Virginia.
Paid Advertisement
Jul. 13, 2020