Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
San Diego in San Diego County, California — The American West (Pacific Coastal)
 

Boundary Marker Number 258

 
 
Boundary Marker Number 258 Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Michael Kindig, August 11, 2007
1. Boundary Marker Number 258 Marker
National Register Number: 1974000550
Inscription.  Near this site the initial point of the boundary between the United States of America and the Republic of Mexico was established October 10, 1849.

Today, the flag of the United States of America is again raised to symbolize friendship between the peoples of the United States and Mexico and to commemorate the establishment of a State Park adjacent to this point on the International Border.
September 27, 1974
Boundary Marker Number 258 was placed
on the National Register of Historic
Places September 6, 1974

 
Erected 1974.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in this topic list: Notable Places. A significant historical date for this entry is October 10, 1849.
 
Location. 32° 32.073′ N, 117° 7.367′ W. Marker is in San Diego, California, in San Diego County. Marker can be reached from Monument Road. The marker is located at Border Field State Park. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: San Diego CA 92154, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 11 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Montgomery Memorial (approx. 4.4 miles away); National City Depot
Paid Advertisement
Click on the ad for more information.
Please report objectionable advertising to the Editor.
Click or scan to see
this page online
(approx. 8.7 miles away); National City Historic Railcar Plaza (approx. 8.7 miles away); United We Land (approx. 9.8 miles away); The Naked Warrior (approx. 10.1 miles away); "Imagine Tent City" (approx. 10.4 miles away); Dragon Tree (approx. 10.6 miles away); Carlin House - 1939 (approx. 10.6 miles away).
 
Also see . . .  Border Field State Park. At the very southwest corner of America is a monument marking the border between Mexico and California. When California became a territory at the end of the Mexican-American War, an international border became a necessity. American and Mexican survey crews determined the boundary and the monument of Italian marble was placed in 1851 to mark the original survey site. Today the monument stands in the shadow of the Tijuana Bull Ring and still delineates the border between the United States and Estádos Unídos Mexicanos. (Submitted on January 23, 2012.) 
 
Border Fence image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Michael Kindig, August 11, 2007
2. Border Fence
Boundary Marker Number 258 (1894) image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Michael Kindig, Boundary o
3. Boundary Marker Number 258 (1894)
NORTH FACE “Boundary of the United States. The destruction or displacement of this monument is a misdemeanor punishable in the United States or Mexico.”

WEST FACE “Initial point of Boundary between the United States and Mexico. Established by a joint commission on October A.D. 1848 agreeable to the Treaty dated at the City of Guadalupe-Hildago February 2 A.D. 1851. John B Weller U.S. Commissioner, Andrew B. Gray, U.S. Surveyor.”

EAST FACE “Reconstructed August 1894 by the International Boundary Commission operated by the conventions of 1882 and 1889.”
Boundary Marker Number 258 (1894) image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Michael Kindig, August 11, 2007
4. Boundary Marker Number 258 (1894)
Border Field State Park image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Michael Kindig, August 11, 2007
5. Border Field State Park
Border Field SP - Surveyor image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Michael Kindig, August 11, 2007
6. Border Field SP - Surveyor
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. It was originally submitted on January 13, 2012, by Michael Kindig of Elk Grove, California. This page has been viewed 996 times since then and 24 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on January 13, 2012, by Michael Kindig of Elk Grove, California. • Syd Whittle was the editor who published this page.

Share this page.  
Share on Tumblr
m=51587

CeraNet Cloud Computing sponsors the Historical Marker Database.
This website earns income from purchases you make after using our links to Amazon.com. We appreciate your support.
Paid Advertisement
Apr. 15, 2024