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Historic District - North in Savannah in Chatham County, Georgia — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Conrad Aiken

 
 
Conrad Aiken Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Mike Stroud, February 2008
1. Conrad Aiken Marker
Inscription.  Conrad Aiken, Poet and Man of Letters, was born in Savannah on August 5, 1889, and lived at No. 228 (opposite) until 1901. After the tragic deaths of his parents, he was moved to New England. Most of his writing career was divided between Cape Cod, Massachusetts and Rye, England. In 1962 he returned to Savannah to live and write in the adjoining house, No. 230 until his death August 17, 1973. Of his home here he wrote: "Born in that most magical of cities, Savannah, I was allowed to run wild in that earthly paradise until I was nine; ideal for the boy who early decided he wanted to write."

Though he wrote novels, short stories and critical essays, his first love was poetry. His work earned many awards including the Pulitzer Prize (1930), National Book Award (1954), and the National Medal of Literature (1969). He was a member of the National Academy of Arts and Sciences and held the Chair of Poetry of the Library of Congress (1950 to 1952). Governor Jimmy Carter appointed him Poet Laureate of Georgia on March 30, 1973. Conrad Aiken is buried beside his parents in Bonaventure Cemetery.
 
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1980 by Georgia Historical Society, Historic Savannah Foundation.
 
Topics and series. This historical marker is listed in this topic list: Arts, Letters, Music. In addition, it is included in the Former U.S. Presidents: #39 James Earl "Jimmy" Carter, Jr. series list. A significant historical date for this entry is March 30, 1973.
 
Location. 32° 4.571′ N, 81° 5.384′ W. Marker is in Savannah, Georgia, in Chatham County. It is in the Historic District - North. Marker is on Oglethorpe Avenue, in the median. across from D.A.R. Colonial Park Cemetery. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Savannah GA 31401, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Gen. Samuel Elbert (1740-1788) (within shouting distance of this marker); 1812 Wesley Chapel (within shouting distance of this marker); William Stephens (within shouting distance of this marker); James Habersham (within shouting distance of this marker); Joseph Habersham (1751-1815) (within shouting distance of this marker); Hugh McCall (1767-1823) (within shouting distance of this marker); Great Yellow Fever Epidemic of 1820 (within shouting distance of this marker); Barnard House (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Savannah.
 
Also see . . .  Conrad Aiken. He was deeply influenced by symbolism,
Green Door is No. 228, while the door on right is No. 230 Oglethorpe Avenue image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Mike Stroud, February 1, 2008
2. Green Door is No. 228, while the door on right is No. 230 Oglethorpe Avenue
especially in his earlier works. In 1930 he received the Pulitzer Prize for Poetry for his Selected Poems. Many of his writings had psychological themes. (Submitted on February 11, 2008, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.) 
 
Conrad Aiken image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Encyclopædia Britannica
3. Conrad Aiken
Conrad Aiken Memorial Bench, gravesite Bonaventure Cemetery, Savannah image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Mike Stroud, 2009
4. Conrad Aiken Memorial Bench, gravesite Bonaventure Cemetery, Savannah
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on February 8, 2023. It was originally submitted on February 11, 2008, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 3,100 times since then and 42 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on February 11, 2008, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.   4. submitted on July 4, 2009, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page.

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Feb. 23, 2024