Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Columbia in Richland County, South Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Bridge at Remagen Stone

 
 
Bridge at Remagen Stone Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Mike Stroud, September 6, 2012
1. Bridge at Remagen Stone Marker
Inscription.  This stone was part of the piers supporting the historic Ludendorff Bridge which once spanned the Rhine River at Remagen, Germany. A forward patrol of the US 9th Armored Division captured the bridge in a surprise attack on March 7, 1945, thereby aiding the Allies with a foothold in Germany. The bridge at Remagen played a key role in the final chapter of World War II.
 
Erected by Fort Jackson.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in this topic list: War, World II. A significant historical month for this entry is March 1975.
 
Location. 34° 0.69′ N, 80° 56.651′ W. Marker is in Columbia, South Carolina, in Richland County. Marker is on Jackson Boulevard, on the right when traveling north. Located between Forney Road and Gregg Street, at Basic Combat Training Museum, Building T-4442. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Columbia SC 29207, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. 31st Inf Division (within shouting distance of this marker); 30th Inf Division (about 600 feet away, measured in a direct line); 4th Infantry Division (approx. 0.3 miles away); 108th Division
Bridge at Remagen Stone Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Mike Stroud, September 6, 2012
2. Bridge at Remagen Stone Marker
Click or scan to see
this page online
(approx. 0.4 miles away); Darby Field (approx. 0.4 miles away); 26th Inf Division (approx. half a mile away); Fort Jackson Elementary School / Hood Street Elementary School (approx. 0.6 miles away); 8th Infantry Division (approx. 0.7 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Columbia.
 
Regarding Bridge at Remagen Stone. The Ludendorff Bridge was originally built during World War I as a means of moving troops and logistics west over the Rhine to reinforce the Western Front. The bridge was designed by Karl Wiener an architect from Mannheim. It was 1070 feet long, had a clearance of 48 feet and 6.68 inches above the normal water level of the Rhine, and its highest point measured 96 feet. The bridge carried two railway tracks and a pedestrian walkway. During World War II, one track was planked over to allow vehicular traffic. (Wikipedia)
 
Also see . . .
1. Ludendorff Bridge, from Wikipedia,. The bridge capture was an important strategic event of WW2 because it was the only remaining bridge over the Rhine River into Germany's heartland and was also strong enough that the Allies could cross immediately with tanks and trucks full of supplies. (Submitted on September 8, 2012, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.)
Bridge at Remagen Stone Marker with a T-30 Heavy Tank display image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Mike Stroud, September 6, 2012
3. Bridge at Remagen Stone Marker with a T-30 Heavy Tank display
 

2. ... a 1969 war film - The Bridge at Remagen..Also seen on the Military Channel. The film is a highly-fictionalized version of actual events during the last months of World War II when the U.S. 9th Armored Division approached Remagen and found the Ludendorff Bridge still intact. The movie re-enacts the week-long battle, and several artillery duels, that the Americans fought before gaining a bridgehead across the Rhine for the final push into Germany. (Submitted on September 8, 2012, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.) 
 
Ludendorff Bridge near Remagen, Germany image. Click for full size.
U.S. Army Archives, circa 1920s
4. Ludendorff Bridge near Remagen, Germany
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on December 5, 2020. It was originally submitted on September 8, 2012, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 1,186 times since then and 46 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on September 10, 2012, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.   4. submitted on September 8, 2012, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.

Share this page.  
Share on Tumblr
m=59296

Paid Advertisements
 
 

May. 28, 2022