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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Sampaloc, Metro Manila, Philippines
 

Santo Tomas Internment Camp

Main Building, University of Santo Tomas

 
 
Santo Tomas Internment Camp Marker image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, January 18, 2013
1. Santo Tomas Internment Camp Marker
Inscription.  
Through these portals passed up to ten thousand Americans and other nationals of the free world who were interned within these walls by the Japanese military. Suffering great physical privation and national humiliation from January 4, 1942, until liberated February 3, 1945, by the American Forces under General Douglas MacArthur.
 
Erected 1954 by American Association of the Philippines.
 
Topics. This memorial is listed in these topic lists: African AmericansWar, World II. A significant historical month for this entry is January 1939.
 
Location. 14° 36.587′ N, 120° 59.372′ E. Marker is in Sampaloc, Metro Manila. Memorial is on Plaza Major just north of España Street, on the right when traveling west. at the front entrance to the UST's "Main Building" on the north side of the Plaza Mayor which is at the center of the campus - bounded on the northwest by Osmeña Drive and on the southeast by Quezon Drive. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: ESpaa, Sampaloc, Manila, Philippines, Sampaloc, Metro Manila 1008, Philippines. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 3 kilometers of this marker, measured as the crow flies. University of Santo Tomas
Santo Tomas Internment Camp Marker, at entrance to the UST Main Building off Plaza Major image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, January 29, 2013
2. Santo Tomas Internment Camp Marker, at entrance to the UST Main Building off Plaza Major
- visible on the wall (in the shadow, upper right, behind the security desk) in the exterior foyer
Click or scan to see
this page online
(here, next to this marker); a different marker also named University of Santo Tomas (within shouting distance of this marker); William J. Burke (approx. 1.7 kilometers away); Roman Ongpin (approx. 1.9 kilometers away); Ang Simbahan ng Binondo (approx. 2 kilometers away in Manila); Philippine Post Office (approx. 2 kilometers away in Manila); Our Lady of the Most Holy Rosary Parish Church (approx. 2 kilometers away); The New Plaza San Lorenzo Ruiz (approx. 2 kilometers away in Kalakhang Maynila).
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker. To better understand the relationship, study each marker in the order shown.
 
Also see . . .
1. Santo Tomas Internment Camp. ... The number of internees in February 1942 amounted to 3,200 Americans, 900 British (including Canadians, Australians, etc.), 40 Poles, 30 Dutch, and individuals from Spain, Mexico, Nicaragua, Cuba, Russia, Belgium, Sweden, Denmark, China, and Burma. About 100 of the total were Filipino or part-Filipino, principally the spouses and children of Americans. Of the Americans, 2,000 were males and 1,200 females, including 450 married couples. Children
Plaque commemorating UST student cadets who fought with Philippine Army and guerrilla units in WWII image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, January 18, 2013
3. Plaque commemorating UST student cadets who fought with Philippine Army and guerrilla units in WWII
- displayed at the UST Museum in the Main Building
numbered 400. Seventy African-Americans were among the internees as were two American Indians, a Mohawk and a Cherokee. The British were divided about equally between male and female. The imbalance in gender among the Americans was primarily due to the fact that, anticipating the war, many wives and children of American men employed in the Philippines had returned to the US before December 8, 1941. A few of the women and children had been sent to the Philippines from China to escape the war in that country. Some had arrived only days before the Japanese attack. ... (Submitted on March 20, 2013, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.) 

2. Lt.Col. Walter H. Loving, Philippine Army. Afro-American soldier, Philippine-American War veteran, acclaimed musician, composer, and martyr. He organized and directed the world-renowned Philippine Constabulary Band prior to WWI. Retiring in Commonwealth, he was interned with his wife, Edith at the Santo Tomas camp in 1942. Eventually allowed to return to the couple's home in Ermita due to his declining health, he and Edith became separated during the Battle of Manila in 1945. He was seized and killed by Japanese soldiers, and his remains were never recovered. (Submitted on March 21, 2013, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.) 
 
Additional keywords.
Santo Tomas Internment Camp: emaciated civilians rescued, Feb 1945 image. Click for full size.
By U.S. Army Signal Corps, Feb 1945
4. Santo Tomas Internment Camp: emaciated civilians rescued, Feb 1945
Battle of Manila; 1st Cavalry Division (U.S.A.); Walter Loving; Paraninfo
 
U.S. Army Nurses, rescued after three years confinement at Santo Tomas and heading for home. image. Click for full size.
By U.S. Army Signal Corps, circa Feb 1945
5. U.S. Army Nurses, rescued after three years confinement at Santo Tomas and heading for home.
"The Angels of Bataan and Corregidor"
Capt. Walter P. Loving, in uniform as director of the Philippine Constabulary Band image. Click for full size.
circa 1910
6. Capt. Walter P. Loving, in uniform as director of the Philippine Constabulary Band
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on January 1, 2020. It was originally submitted on March 20, 2013, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland. This page has been viewed 1,234 times since then and 39 times this year. Last updated on April 2, 2014, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on March 20, 2013, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.   4, 5, 6. submitted on March 21, 2013, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.

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