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Huntington in Huntington County, Indiana — The American Midwest (Great Lakes)
 

The “Lime City”

 
 
The "Lime City" Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Christopher Light, April 24, 2008
1. The "Lime City" Marker
Inscription.  Huntington, the “Lime City.” so named for its many limestone quarries and kilns, the first kiln being built in this vicinity by Michael Houseman in 1843 or 1844. By 1885 there were 31 kilns in operation: eight were perpetual kilns, the others were occasional kilns. The lime was of such high quality it was shipped out of the state as well as being used locally.
 
Erected 1979 by South Side Business Association. (Marker Number 35.1979.2.)
 
Topics and series. This historical marker is listed in this topic list: Industry & Commerce. In addition, it is included in the Indiana Historical Bureau Markers series list. A significant historical year for this entry is 1843.
 
Location. 40° 52.692′ N, 85° 30.423′ W. Marker is in Huntington, Indiana, in Huntington County. Marker is on West Park Drive (U.S. 24). Just west of Sunken Park on US 24. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Huntington IN 46750, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Huntington Grand Army of the Republic Memorial (within shouting distance of this marker); Huntington Vietnam War Memorial (within
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shouting distance of this marker); Operation Iraqi Freedom Memorial (within shouting distance of this marker); Lockheed T-33A Shooting Star (within shouting distance of this marker); Huntington World War I Memorial (within shouting distance of this marker); Huntington World War II Memorial (within shouting distance of this marker); Huntington Veterans Memorial (within shouting distance of this marker); Huntington Korean War Memorial (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Huntington.
 
Additional commentary.
1. Photograph No. 4
The limestone house in this photo was recently razed by the city of Huntington by order of Mayor Brooks Fetters. This was known as the Milligan Slave House. Where Lambdin P. Milligan, see Ex Parte Milligan marker, reportedly kept runaway slaves until they could be returned to their owners. The razing occurred without input from any local historical groups.
    — Submitted December 30, 2018, by Willard McKinzie of Huntington, Indiana.
 
The “Lime City” Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By J. J. Prats, May 5, 2024
2. The “Lime City” Marker
Close up of image on the marker image. Click for full size.
3. Close up of image on the marker
The “Lime City” Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Duane Hall, August 13, 2014
4. The “Lime City” Marker
View to west along W. Park Drive (US 24)
near entrance to Memorial Park
The "Lime City" Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Christopher Light, April 24, 2008
5. The "Lime City" Marker
Limestone Structure across the street from the marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Christopher Light, April 24, 2008
6. Limestone Structure across the street from the marker
The “Lime City” Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Duane Hall, August 13, 2014
7. The “Lime City” Marker
View to southeast
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on May 12, 2024. It was originally submitted on May 2, 2008, by Christopher Light of Valparaiso, Indiana. This page has been viewed 1,578 times since then and 35 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on May 2, 2008, by Christopher Light of Valparaiso, Indiana.   2. submitted on May 12, 2024, by J. J. Prats of Powell, Ohio.   3. submitted on May 2, 2008, by Christopher Light of Valparaiso, Indiana.   4. submitted on August 22, 2014, by Duane Hall of Abilene, Texas.   5, 6. submitted on May 2, 2008, by Christopher Light of Valparaiso, Indiana.   7. submitted on August 22, 2014, by Duane Hall of Abilene, Texas. • Christopher Busta-Peck was the editor who published this page.

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May. 27, 2024