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Death Valley Junction in Inyo County, California — The American West (Pacific Coastal)
 

Death Valley Junction

 
 
Death Valley Junction Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Richard Wisehart
1. Death Valley Junction Marker
Inscription.  This historic crossroad has been used by Indians, Clampers, Death Valley 49ers, ranchers, farmers, settlers and tourists. The town was originally called Amargosa. In 1907, the name was changed to Death Valley Junction. At this junction, the Tonopah & Tidewater Railroad connected with the Las Vegas-Tonopah Railroad to service the Ryan and Lila C. borax mines near Ryan during the years 1914-28. Death Valley Junction had rail service until 1940. At it's peak, the town had a population of 300. Today, the town is on the National Register of Historic Places.
 
Erected 1988 by Billy Holcomb, Joaquin Murrieta, Slim Princess and John P. Squibob Chapters of E. Clampus Vitus. (Marker Number 51.)
 
Topics and series. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Notable PlacesRailroads & StreetcarsSettlements & Settlers. In addition, it is included in the E Clampus Vitus series list. A significant historical year for this entry is 1907.
 
Location. 36° 18.098′ N, 116° 24.857′ W. Marker is in Death Valley Junction, California, in Inyo
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County. Marker is on State Highway 127, ¼ mile south of State Highway 190, on the right when traveling south. Located in front of the Amargosa Hotel & Opera House. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 608 Death Valley Road, Death Valley CA 92328, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 7 other markers are within 13 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Amargosa Opera House (within shouting distance of this marker); Longstreet Chapel (approx. 7.7 miles away in Nevada); Jack Longstreet (approx. 7.7 miles away in Nevada); Amargosa Valley's Clay Industry (approx. 7.7 miles away in Nevada); A Changing Landscape (approx. 10.4 miles away in Nevada); Cultural Clues to the Past (approx. 10½ miles away in Nevada); Jack's Stone Cabin (approx. 12½ miles away in Nevada).
 
More about this marker. At the same time this Plaque was being erected and dedicated, the Grand Council of E Clampus Vitus dedicated a marker commemorating the Amargosa Opera House. It is fastened to the east side of the Opera House, which is now listed on the National Register of Historic Places.
SOURCE: Billy Holcomb Chapter 1069 35th Anniversary Plaque Book by Phillip Holdaway
 
Death Valley Junction Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Mike Stroud, June 12, 2010
2. Death Valley Junction Marker
Death Valley Junction Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Richard Wisehart, October 25, 2008
3. Death Valley Junction Marker
Amargosa Opera House in background.
National Register of Historic Places image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Craig Baker
4. National Register of Historic Places
Commemorative Pin image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Michael Kindig, October 29, 1988
5. Commemorative Pin
Death Valley Junction, Amargosa Opera House, Oct 29 1988, Plaqued by E Clampus Vitus.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on April 24, 2024. It was originally submitted on November 19, 2008, by Richard Wisehart of Sonora, California. This page has been viewed 2,706 times since then and 67 times this year. Last updated on November 3, 2014, by Michael Kindig of Elk Grove, California. Photos:   1. submitted on November 19, 2008, by Richard Wisehart of Sonora, California.   2. submitted on July 5, 2010, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.   3. submitted on November 19, 2008, by Richard Wisehart of Sonora, California.   4. submitted on March 27, 2024, by Craig Baker of Sylmar, California.   5. submitted on August 8, 2016, by Michael Kindig of Elk Grove, California. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.

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Jun. 12, 2024