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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”

Buckeystown in Frederick County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Site of Buckeystown Methodist Episcopal Church

 
 
Site of Buckeystown Methodist Episcopal Church Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, November 8, 2015
1. Site of Buckeystown Methodist Episcopal Church Marker
Inscription.  
To your left is a street scene of the intersection in Buckeystown around 1899. The house immediately on your left was built around 1898 as the residence for the superintendent of the Buckingham School for Boys, located south of town (now ClaggettCenter). The house on the intersection is one of three buildings built of stone quarried from the same vein as the church that was on this site. In 1939, Frank Lloyd Wright, architect, visited this home as he was passing through Buckeystown after visiting Sugarloaf Mountain. He admired the south facing stone wall and stayed for tea. Heading north up the hill and across the creek, note the white frame tannery buildings torn down in 1904, and at the top of the hill can be seen the brick home of George Buckey, now Catoctin Inn. To your right is the Inn at Buckeystown, built as a private residence in 1897 by Charles Keller who made his fortune in the lime and stone business.

Here stood the stone Methodist Episcopal Church and cemetery. The building was constructed in 1824 on 1/2 acre of land donated by Ignatius Davis, with money raised by subscriptions. The church measured 33 feet by 45 feet
Site of Buckeystown Methodist Episcopal Church Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, November 8, 2015
2. Site of Buckeystown Methodist Episcopal Church Marker
and cost $1000. Wide galleries lined three sides and seven benches were placed in the center. The Civil War divided Buckeystown, and the church doors were closed when a Northern minister was appointed. According to the History of Carrollton Manor, the building was used as a library for a short time at the turn of the century. In 1905, Charles Thomas, who lived across the street in the white brick house with black shutters, dismantled the church and used the stone for foundations of houses that he built for the Thomas and Son Brick Yard employees and Buckeystown Packing Company employees. These ten houses were built on Buchingham Lane, a short walk uphill to your right. The stone for this church was quarried along the Monocracy River, east of Buckeystown, form a rare iron-rich vein. As you look to your left , two stone buildings across the street and the one on the right were all built of this unusual stone.

Erected by Buckeystown Preservation Society, 1995
 
Erected 1995 by Buckeystown Preservation Society.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in this topic list: Churches & Religion.
 
Location. 39° 19.906′ N, 77° 25.943′ W. Marker is in Buckeystown, Maryland, in Frederick County. Marker is on Buckeystown Pike (Maryland Route 80), on the
Buckeystown 1899 image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, November 8, 2015
3. Buckeystown 1899
Close-up of photo on marker
right when traveling west. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 3521 Buckeystown Pike, Buckeystown MD 21717, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 3 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Buckeystown (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); Buckeystown Park (approx. one mile away); The Battle That Saved Washington (approx. 2.6 miles away); History of the Monocacy River Valley (approx. 2.6 miles away); Clustered Spires of Frederick (approx. 2.6 miles away); Worthington House (approx. 2.6 miles away); McCausland’s Attack (approx. 2.6 miles away); Worthington-McKinney Ford (approx. 2.6 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Buckeystown.
 
Buckeystown Methodist Episcopal Church image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, November 8, 2015
4. Buckeystown Methodist Episcopal Church
Close-up of photo on marker
The superintendent's House image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, November 8, 2015
5. The superintendent's House
Stone House image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, November 8, 2015
6. Stone House
Where Frank Lloyd Wright stayed as part of his failed attempt to desecrate Sugarloaf mountain.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on September 28, 2020. It was originally submitted on November 11, 2015, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. This page has been viewed 318 times since then and 4 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on November 11, 2015, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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Jan. 21, 2021