Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Georgetown in Georgetown County, South Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Rainey-Camlin House

 
 
Rainey-Camlin House Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, April 2, 2017
1. Rainey-Camlin House Marker
Inscription.
Has Been Designated A
National
Historic Landmark

This site possesses national significance
in commemorating the history of the
United States of America

 
Erected 1984 by National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior.
 
Location. 33° 22.133′ N, 79° 17.05′ W. Marker is in Georgetown, South Carolina, in Georgetown County. Marker is on Prince Street, on the right when traveling north. Touch for map. Between King and Orange Streets. Marker is at or near this postal address: 909 Prince Street, Georgetown SC 29440, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 10 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Joseph Hayne Rainey (within shouting distance of this marker); Methodists (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); City of Georgetown (about 700 feet away); These Two Cannons (about 700 feet away); Landing of Lafayette (about 700 feet away); Kaminski House (about 700 feet away); 24 Pound Naval Gun (about 800 feet away); William Doyle Morgan House (about 800 feet away); South Carolina's Third Oldest City (about 800 feet away); Robert Stewart House (approx. 0.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Georgetown.
 
Also see . . .
Rainey-Camlin House Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, April 2, 2017
2. Rainey-Camlin House Marker

1. Rainey-Camlin House. National Register nomination information. (Submitted on April 9, 2017, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

2. Joseph H. Rainey House. The Joseph H. Rainey House, also known as the Rainey-Camlin House, is a historic house at 909 Prince Street in Georgetown, South Carolina. Built in the 1760s, it was the home of the first black United States Congressman, Joseph H. Rainey, a former slave. It was designated a National Historic Landmark in 1984. (Submitted on April 9, 2017, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

3. Joseph H. Rainey. Joseph Hayne Rainey (June 21, 1832 – August 1, 1887) was an American politician. He was the first African American to serve in the United States House of Representatives, the second black person to serve in the United States Congress, and the first black presiding officer of the House of Representatives. Born into slavery in South Carolina, he was freed in the 1840s by his father purchasing the freedom of his entire family and himself. (Submitted on April 9, 2017, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 
 
Additional comments.
1. Rainey-Camlin House
On December 12, 1870, Joseph Hayne Rainey (1832-1887) was sworn in as a Member of the Forty-first Congress of the
Rainey-Camlin House Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, April 2, 2017
3. Rainey-Camlin House Marker
United States, the first African-American person to serve in the US House of Representatives. He also served longer than any of his black contemporaries. Local tradition maintains that Rainey was born in this house and lived there until 1846, when the family relocated to Charleston. After the Civil War, Rainey settled in this house and it was from here that he launched his political career in 1867. During his tenure in Congress, it served as his district headquarters and his place of residence when Congress was not in session. He eventually died here in 1887, the house remaining in the family until it was sold in 1896. Listed in the National Register April 20, 1984; Designated a National Historic Landmark April 20, 1984.
    — Submitted April 9, 2017, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.

2. Joseph Hayne Rainey (1832-1887)
RAINEY, Joseph Hayne, a Representative from South Carolina; born in Georgetown, Georgetown County, S.C., June 21, 1832; received a limited schooling; followed the trade of barber until 1862, when upon being forced to work on the Confederate fortifications in Charleston, S.C., he escaped to the West Indies and remained there until the close of the war; delegate to the State constitutional convention in 1868; member of the State senate in 1870 but resigned;
Rainey-Camlin House image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, April 2, 2017
4. Rainey-Camlin House
elected as a Republican to the Forty-first Congress to fill the vacancy caused by the action of the House of Representatives in declaring the seat of B. Franklin Whittemore vacant and was the first black to be elected to the House of Representatives; reelected to the Forty-second and to the three succeeding Congresses and served from December 12, 1870, to March 3, 1879; appointed internal-revenue agent of South Carolina on May 22, 1879, and served until July 15, 1881, when he resigned; engaged in banking and the brokerage business in Washington, D.C.; retired from all business activities in 1886, returned to Georgetown, S.C., and died there August 2, 1887; interment in the Baptist Cemetery. (Source: Biographical Directory of the United States Congress.)
    — Submitted April 9, 2017, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.

 
Categories. African AmericansNotable Buildings
 
Joggling Board image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, April 2, 2017
5. Joggling Board
Joseph Hayne Rainey (June 21, 1832 – August 1, 1887) image. Click for full size.
Library of Congress, Thomas Brady Collection
6. Joseph Hayne Rainey (June 21, 1832 – August 1, 1887)
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on April 9, 2017. This page originally submitted on April 9, 2017, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 195 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on April 9, 2017, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.
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