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Fort Stanton in Lincoln County, New Mexico — The American Mountains (Southwest)
 

American Merchant Marine Monuments

 
 
American Merchant Marine Monument image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, April 3, 2017
1. American Merchant Marine Monument
Inscription.
In Memory Of
The Men And Women
Of The
American Merchant Marine

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American Merchant Marine Veterans
This ancient anchor is a tribute to Merchant Mariners the world over. Donated by Betty Wattam in memory of Joseph Wattam. Dedicated to Victor and Jean Schaerer by
American Merchant Marine Veterans
Roadrunner Chapter
Albuquerque, New Mexico
Dedicated May 22, 1995

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American Merchant Marine Veterans
This 5 ton anchor taken from the Drake Victory is a memorial to Merchant Marine Veterans of WW II wherever they are. Their casualty rate of 1 to 32 was one of the highest of all services.
Dedicated May 22, 1993
American Merchant Marine Veterans
Roadrunner Chapter
Albuquerque, New Mexico

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American Merchant Marine Veterans
In memory of Veterans of all wars who offered their lives for the liberty that Americans believe in.
Dedicated May 22, 1993
American Merchant Marine Veterans
Roadrunner Chapter
Albuquerque, New Mexico

 
Erected 1993 by American Merchant Marine Veterans
American Merchant Marine Monument image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, April 3, 2017
2. American Merchant Marine Monument
Roadrunner Chapter.
 
Location. 33° 29.408′ N, 105° 30.939′ W. Marker is in Fort Stanton, New Mexico, in Lincoln County. Marker is on Billy the Kid Trail (State Road 200) 0.1 miles south of Black Jack Pershing Road, on the left when traveling south. Touch for map. Located in the Fort Stanton Veterans Cemetery. Marker is in this post office area: Fort Stanton NM 88323, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Stables and Corrals (approx. 0.6 miles away); Community House (approx. 0.6 miles away); TB Tent Cottages (approx. 0.6 miles away); Buildings 17 - 20 (approx. 0.6 miles away); Barracks / Dining Hall (approx. 0.7 miles away); Hospital Administration (approx. 0.7 miles away); Fort Stanton (approx. 0.7 miles away); Guardhouse (approx. 0.7 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Fort Stanton.
 
More about this marker. There Monuments are all within a few steps
 
Categories. Heroes
 
American Merchant Marine Monument image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, April 3, 2017
3. American Merchant Marine Monument
American Merchant Marine Monument image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, April 3, 2017
4. American Merchant Marine Monument
American Merchant Marine Monument image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, April 3, 2017
5. American Merchant Marine Monument
American Merchant Marine Monument image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, April 3, 2017
6. American Merchant Marine Monument
American Merchant Marine Monument image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, April 3, 2017
7. American Merchant Marine Monument
American Merchant Marine Monument image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, April 3, 2017
8. American Merchant Marine Monument
The Story of the Coins: image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, April 3, 2017
9. The Story of the Coins:
text in the white box

While visiting some cemeteries you may notice that headstones marking certain graves have coins on them, left by previous visitors to the grave. These coins have distinct meanings when left on the headstones of those who gave their life while serving in America's military, and these meanings vary depending on denomination.

A coin left on a headstone or at the grave site is meant as a message to the deceased soldier's family that someone else has visited the grave to pay respect.

Leaving a penny at the grave means simply that you visited. A nickel indicates that you and the deceased trained at boot camp together, while a dime means that you served with him in some capacity. By leaving a quarter at the grave, you are telling the family that you were with the soldier when he was killed. According to tradition, the money left at the graves in national and state veterans cemeteries eventually collected, and the funds are put toward maintaining the cemetery or paying the costs for indigent veterans. In the U.S. the practice became common during the Vietnam War, due to the political divide in the country over the war; leaving a coin was seen as a more practical way to communicate that you had visited the grave than contacting the soldier's family, which could devolve into an uncomfortable argument over politics relating to the war. Some Vietnam veterans would leave coins as a "down payment" to buy their fallen comrades a beer or play a hand of cards when they would finally be reunited.
Entrance to the Fort Stanton Veterans Cemetery image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, April 3, 2017
10. Entrance to the Fort Stanton Veterans Cemetery
The Fort Stanton Veterans Cemetery image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, April 3, 2017
11. The Fort Stanton Veterans Cemetery
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on April 16, 2017. This page originally submitted on April 15, 2017, by Michael Herrick of Southbury, Connecticut. This page has been viewed 102 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11. submitted on April 15, 2017, by Michael Herrick of Southbury, Connecticut.
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