Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Grand Canyon National Park in Coconino County, Arizona — The American Mountains (Southwest)
 

Grand Canyon Depot

 
 
Grand Canyon Depot Marker image. Click for full size.
By Denise Boose, December 9, 2016
1. Grand Canyon Depot Marker
Inscription. In 1901, the screech of train brakes and the blast of a train whistle signaled the arrival of a new era in Grand Canyon Village. The railroad provided the most comfortable means of transportation to the canyon for more than a quarter century. This log depot, finished in 1910, welcomed train passengers to a growing village. By 1924, a community development plan was created for the village. Almost a century later, that planned community forms the core of Grand Canyon Village, centering on the last operational log depot in the country. Today, the depot is carefully preserved and still welcomes passengers to the canyon.
 
Erected by Grand Canyon National Park.
 
Location. 36° 3.404′ N, 112° 8.201′ W. Marker is in Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona, in Coconino County. Marker can be reached from Village Loop Drive. Touch for map. Marker is located on the train track side. Marker is in this post office area: Grand Canyon AZ 86023, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Santa Fe Depot (here, next to this marker); El Tovar Hotel (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); Hopi House (about 400 feet away); a different marker also named Hopi House
Grand Canyon Depot Marker image. Click for full size.
By Denise Boose, December 9, 2016
2. Grand Canyon Depot Marker
(about 500 feet away); Verkamp's Curios (about 500 feet away); CCC Legacy (about 700 feet away); Trans-Canyon Telephone Line (about 700 feet away); Bright Angel Lodge (approx. 0.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Grand Canyon National Park.
 
Categories. Man-Made FeaturesRailroads & Streetcars
 
Grand Canyon Depot image. Click for full size.
By Denise Boose, December 9, 2016
3. Grand Canyon Depot
Photo Displayed on Marker image. Click for full size.
4. Photo Displayed on Marker
In 1989, passenger service resumed, bringing thousands of visitors to Grand Canyon by rail each year. Traveling this way lessens auto congestion on traffic-busy park roads.
Photo Displayed on Marker image. Click for full size.
5. Photo Displayed on Marker
These photos depict a thriving Grand Canyon rail operation, but with the opening of the paved automotive highway from Williams, Arizona, in 1926, that began to change. Ridership declined for decades. Finally, in 1968, the passengers service and depot closed.
Photo Displayed on Marker image. Click for full size.
6. Photo Displayed on Marker
The original depot was a small shack located west of here. The need for a larger, more sophisticated structure quickly became apparent.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on April 28, 2017. This page originally submitted on April 16, 2017, by Denise Boose of Tehachapi, California. This page has been viewed 75 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on April 16, 2017, by Denise Boose of Tehachapi, California. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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