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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Neeses in Orangeburg County, South Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Rocky Swamp Rosenwald School

 
 
Rocky Swamp Rosenwald School Marker (front) image. Click for full size.
By Dean Moss McCracken, May 9, 2017
1. Rocky Swamp Rosenwald School Marker (front)
Inscription. (front)
This is the site of the Rocky Swamp Rosenwald School, a frame three-room school built here in 1920-21 for African-American students in Neeses and vicinity. An elementary school with two to three teachers in grades 1-9, it was one of more than 500 schools in S.C. funded in part by the Julius Rosenwald Foundation.
(Continued on other side)
(rear)
(Continued from other side)
This school was built at a total cost of $4,100, with contributions from the black community, the white community, Orangeburg County, and the Rosenwald Fund. It opened for the 1921-22 school year with 199 students, averaging 145 students until 1942. Rocky Swamp closed after the 1950-51 school year.
 
Erected 2013 by The Rocky Swamp Rosenwald Historical Marker Committee and The Orangeburg Chapter of the Links. (Marker Number 38 37.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Rosenwald Schools marker series.
 
Location. 33° 28.449′ N, 81° 11.175′ W. Marker is near Neeses, South Carolina, in Orangeburg County. Marker is on Norway Road (County Highway 332) 0.3 miles west of Trojan Street (County Highway 2218), on the right when
Rocky Swamp Rosenwald School Marker (rear) image. Click for full size.
By Dean Moss McCracken, May 9, 2017
2. Rocky Swamp Rosenwald School Marker (rear)
traveling west. Touch for map. The Marker is in front of the Hunter-Kinard-Tyler School. Marker is at or near this postal address: 7066 Norway Road, Neeses SC 29107, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 10 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Neeses (approx. 5.3 miles away); God’s Acre Healing Springs (approx. 7.6 miles away); a different marker also named God’s Acre Healing Springs (approx. 7.6 miles away); Healing Springs (approx. 7.6 miles away); a different marker also named God’s Acre Healing Springs (approx. 7.6 miles away); Capt. Dempsey Hammond Salley (approx. 9.4 miles away); The Salley Family (approx. 9.4 miles away); Barnwell County Courthouse (approx. 9.5 miles away).
 
Regarding Rocky Swamp Rosenwald School. Rocky Swamp School; The Rocky Swamp Rosenwald School was a Three Teacher Type School. Three Teacher Type Rosenwald schools typically consisted of at least four rooms, three classrooms and an industrial room. The Rocky Swamp School was a classic Rosenwald School and was funded four ways. African-Americans; $1250.00, Whites; $350.00, Public (taxes); $1500.00, and Rosenwald Building Fund; $1,000.00.

Rosenwald Buildings; The Rosenwald Rural Community Schools were built from 1912-1932 in fifteen states
Looking west on Norway Road image. Click for full size.
By Dean Moss McCracken, May 9, 2017
3. Looking west on Norway Road
in the Jim Crow south. Booker T. Washington (1856-1915) and Julius Rosenwald (1862-1932) partnered to build 5,357 buildings. The first school was built in Loachapoka, Alabama, about ten miles north of the Tuskegee Institute. The last school was built in 1937 at the special request of Franklin Delano Roosevelt in Warm Springs, Georgia well after the building fund ceased to fund schools in 1932.

South Carolina Rosenwald Buildings; In South Carolina, there were 481 schools, 8 teachers homes and 11 industrial shops built, totaling 500 buildings. Orangeburg County boasted 20 buildings. Neighboring counties had fewer buildings. Aiken County had 13, Bamberg; 3, Barnwell; 8, Berkley; 2, Calhoun; 2, Colleton; 6, Clarendon; 3, Dorchester; 2, and Lexington County had 14. Orangeburg County also has two standing Teachers Homes. One on the campus of South Carolina State University and the wonderful Great Branch Teacherage. The Great Branch Teacherage is fully restored and can be visited. (See link below)

Sources;
• Deutsch, Stephanie. You Need a Schoolhouse: Booker T. Washington, Julius Rosenwald, and the Building of Schools for the Segregated South. Northwestern University Press. Evanston, IL. 2011.
• Fisk University Rosenwald Database. http://www.rosenwald.fisk.edu.
• Hoffschwelle, Mary. The Rosenwald Schools of the American South.
Hunter-Kinard-Tyler School (pre-K thru 12). image. Click for full size.
By Dean Moss McCracken, May 9, 2017
4. Hunter-Kinard-Tyler School (pre-K thru 12).
University Press of Florida. Gainsville, Fl. 2006.
• South Carolina Department of Archives and History. http://www.shpo.sc.gov/res/Pages/Rosenwald.aspx.
 
Also see . . .  More information on Rosenwald Schools and Buildings:. (Submitted on May 13, 2017, by Dean Moss McCracken of Lakeland, Florida.)
 
Categories. African AmericansEducation
 
The Rocky Swamp Rosenwald School image. Click for full size.
By Dean Moss McCracken
5. The Rocky Swamp Rosenwald School
Photo Courtesy; Palmetto History.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on May 15, 2017. This page originally submitted on May 13, 2017, by Dean Moss McCracken of Lakeland, Florida. This page has been viewed 67 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on May 13, 2017, by Dean Moss McCracken of Lakeland, Florida. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
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