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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
White Mills in Wayne County, Pennsylvania — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

There Was More to White Mills than Glass

Men, Women, and Children Put Life into the Community.

 

—The White Mills Community Trail —

 
There Was More to White Mills than Glass Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., June 4, 2017
1. There Was More to White Mills than Glass Marker
Inscription.

There was more to White Mills than glass and glassmaking. The people who lived here — im[m]igrants and their descendants — built an active, vital community. Devout worship and a love of country, entertainment, sports, education, and commerce complimented their strong work ethic. Families and neighbors shared a common experience, which sustained them through good times and bad. White Mills is a community proud of its heritage but ready for the future.

[Photo captions, from left to right, read]
The 1867 Glassworker's House (third on the left) became the catalyst for historic preservation in While Mills when Dr. Walter Barbe purchased it to preserve it in 2001. Seven sloped-roofed buildings, completed in early 1867, were the first houses built by Christian Dorflinger for the workers at his nearby glass factory. In fewer than two years, thirty-three more houses were built in White Mills for 182 employees and their families. The house was restored to its 1875 condition when siding was placed over the board-and-batten walls, and the back porch (summer kitchen) and part of the front porch were enclosed.

The bat is a virtuoso piece of cutting by Liljequist. Fred Houth did the rough-cut, and the blank was blown by Peter Jones. The round knob of the handle is cut in "Sharp Diamond," followed by the plain

There Was More to White Mills than Glass Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., June 4, 2017
2. There Was More to White Mills than Glass Marker
The chimney of the Dorflinger Factory Museum is in the distance
handgrip. As the shape begins to increase, the pattern is "Notched Prism," followed by "Sharp Diamond" and a second band of "Notched Prism." As the shape reaches the tip, the patterns of "Hob Star,["] "Harvard," and "Hob Star" complete the work. An entry in the diary of Louis J. Dorflinger reads "Baseball bat made for Eddie Murphy cost to cut 13.60 Glass 4.50 Case 7.25 Total 25.35."

Eddie Murphy played on the White Mills baseball team, managed by John C. Dorflinger, in 1907. Murphy, a right fielder, made it to the World Series of 1913 with Connie Mack's Philadelphia Athletics. His former friends in White Mills fashioned him a regulation-size cut-glass bat. It was to be presented by Governor John K. Tener, but he was detained by official business, so the gift was made by John C. Dorflinger.

As in countless other American towns at the turn of the century, the general interest and activity during the summer in White Mills centered around the success of the local ball club. Nearly every boy owned a ball and glove, and many boys later graduated into the Big Leagues, including White Mill's own Eddie Murphy, second from the left in the back row. Team manager John C. Dorflinger is the man seated in the front row, center.

The first school near White Mills was located in Palmyra Township, just south of the present day village. It was built circa 1850 for the children of the employees

There Was More to White Mills than Glass Marker Photo image. Click for full size.
By Unknown, 1907
3. There Was More to White Mills than Glass Marker Photo
of Farnham's Saw Mills. Soon after Christian Dorflinger built his glassworks in White Mills in 1865, this school was too small due to the many newcomers to the area. Dorflinger solved the problem by building another school around 1870 in Texas Township, just north of his glassworks. This frame building, which was torn down in 2007, was two stories high. Both schools were replaced in 1900 by the brick structure pictured above. It was constructed in 1899 on School Street and today is a private residence.
 
Erected by Dorflinger-Suydam Wildlife Sanctuary, Lackawanna Heritage Valley, DCNR, Lackawanna Wonderful, and National Park Service.
 
Location. 41° 31.627′ N, 75° 12.131′ W. Marker is in White Mills, Pennsylvania, in Wayne County. Touch for map. Marker is on the grounds of the Dorflinger Factory Museum. Marker is at or near this postal address: 8 Elizabeth Street, White Mills PA 18473, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Skills Passed Down through Generations... (a few steps from this marker); When Christian Dorflinger Melded His Art with History... (a few steps from this marker); As the Company Prospered, So Did the Community. (within shouting distance of this marker); Dorflinger: America's Finest Glass... (within shouting distance of this marker); From Alsace, France to White Mills... (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); Dorflinger Glass Works (about 400 feet away); The Canal and the Rails Spark the Growth of White Mills... (about 500 feet away); Watching Over Their Livelihood and Their Homes (about 500 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in White Mills.
 
Also see . . .
1. Dorflinger Factory Museum. (Submitted on June 5, 2017, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.)
2. Dorflinger Glass Museum. (Submitted on June 5, 2017, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.)
3. White Mills Community Trail may open in fall (2008 Wayne Independent article). (Submitted on June 5, 2017, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.)
4. Eddie Murphy. (Submitted on June 5, 2017, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.)
 
Categories. EducationSettlements & SettlersSports
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 5, 2017. This page originally submitted on June 5, 2017, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania. This page has been viewed 59 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on June 5, 2017, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.
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