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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Lynchburg, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Paul Laurence Dunbar High School

 
 
Paul Laurence Dunbar High School Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, June 8, 2017
1. Paul Laurence Dunbar High School Marker
Inscription. African American community leaders petitioned Lynchburg’s school board for a new high school to serve black students early in the 1920s. Named for poet Paul Laurence Dunbar, the school opened here in 1923. Shop, home economics, and administration buildings were later constructed. Clarence W. Seay, principal from 1938 to 1968, recruited a dedicated faculty and expanded the curriculum. Counselor Pauline Weeden Maloney guided many graduates to major universities. The school’s cultural, literary, and athletic programs made it a focal point for the African American community. Dunbar became a junior high school in 1970-71, and the original building was demolished in 1979.
 
Erected 2015 by Department of Historic Resources. (Marker Number Q-6-35.)
 
Location. 37° 24.502′ N, 79° 8.831′ W. Marker is in Lynchburg, Virginia. Marker is at the intersection of 12th Street and Polk Street, on the left when traveling west on 12th Street. Touch for map. It is at Dunbar Middle School for Innovation. Marker is in this post office area: Lynchburg VA 24504, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Dunbar High School (a few steps from this marker); Lynchburg Civil War Hospitals
Paul Laurence Dunbar High School Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, June 8, 2017
2. Paul Laurence Dunbar High School Marker
(approx. 0.2 miles away); Diamond Hill Baptist Church (approx. 0.2 miles away); Inner Defenses (approx. ¼ mile away); Federal Hill (approx. 0.3 miles away); John Warwick Daniel (approx. 0.4 miles away); a different marker also named Inner Defenses (approx. 0.4 miles away); Camp Davis (approx. 0.4 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Lynchburg.
 
Also see . . .
1. Paul Laurence Dunbar High School. Virginia Foundation for the Humanities article in the African American Historic Sites Database. “As the 1930s progressed, African Americans moved into teaching and administrative roles at Dunbar High School. Clarence Williams Seay became the first African-American principal of the school, serving in that position from 1938 until his retirement in 1968. Under Mr. Seay’s leadership, the school continued to excel academically, focusing on meeting the needs of all African-American children in Lynchburg and offering cultural, athletic, and educational community programs. General education and vocational courses were added to the curriculum,
Paul Laurence Dunbar Middle School for Innovation — Home of the Poets image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, June 8, 2017
3. Paul Laurence Dunbar Middle School for Innovation — Home of the Poets
leading to increased enrollment and graduation rates. The new curriculum became fully accredited by the 1950s.” (Submitted on June 16, 2017.) 

2. Wikipedia entry for Paul Laurence Dunbar. Excerpt: “Paul Laurence Dunbar (1872–1906) was an American poet, novelist, and playwright of the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Born in Dayton, Ohio, to parents who had been enslaved in Kentucky before the American Civil War, Dunbar began to write stories and verse when still a child and was president of his high school’s literary society. He published his first poems at the age of 16 in a Dayton newspaper.

“Much of Dunbar’s more popular work in his lifetime was written in the Negro dialect associated with the antebellum South, though he also used the Midwestern regional dialect of James Whitcomb Riley. Dunbar’s work was praised by William Dean Howells, a leading editor associated with the Harper’s Weekly, and Dunbar was one of the first African-American writers to establish an international reputation. He wrote the lyrics for the musical comedy In Dahomey (1903), the first all-African-American musical produced on Broadway. The musical later also toured in the United States and the United Kingdom.

“Dunbar also wrote in conventional English in other poetry and novels; since the late 20th century, scholars have become more interested
Paul Laurence Dunbar (1872–1906), poet, writer image. Click for full size.
Via Wikipedia Commons, 1890
4. Paul Laurence Dunbar (1872–1906), poet, writer
in these other works. Suffering from tuberculosis, Dunbar died at the age of 33.” (Submitted on June 16, 2017.) 
 
Categories. African AmericansEducation
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2017. This page originally submitted on June 16, 2017, by J. J. Prats of Powell, Ohio. This page has been viewed 57 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on June 16, 2017, by J. J. Prats of Powell, Ohio.
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