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Louisville in Jefferson County, Kentucky — The American South (East South Central)
 

Kentucky Medal Of Honor Memorial

 
 
Kentucky Medal Of Honor Memorial image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, May 19, 2017
1. Kentucky Medal Of Honor Memorial
Inscription.
Kentucky
Medal Of Honor
Memorial

( east side )
The Medal of Honor
America’s highest award for combat valor, the Medal of Honor is presented to armed forces personnel who risked – and often gave – their lives in service to our country. It is bestowed on the few who have performed acts of the most conspicuous gallantry, rising far above and beyond the call of duty in the presence of an armed enemy. The Medal of Honor is a symbol of American heroism that has no equal.
John C. Squires
Sergeant, United States Army
May 19, 1925 – May 23, 1944
Jefferson County Native John C. Squires was the first Kentuckian to receive the Medal of Honor during World War II. His courage in April 1944 enabled his company to secure a stronghold on Italy’s Spaccassasi Creek by single-handedly capturing 21 enemy soldiers. Squires was killed in action the following month, four days after his 19th birthday. This sculpture depicts Squires on the night of his heroic action.
Dedicated by
Jefferson County Commissioner Russ Maple
November 12, 2001
Sculpted by
Doyle Glass


( west side )
Kentucky’s Medal of Honor Recipients
Civil War (1861-1865)
Army Captain William
Kentucky Medal Of Honor Memorial image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, May 19, 2017
2. Kentucky Medal Of Honor Memorial
( east side )
P. Black · Army Private John H. Callahan · Army Sergeant John S. Darrough · Army Private John Davis · Army Drummer William H. Horsfall · Army Private Aaron Hudson · Army Private Henry B. Mattingly · Army Sergeant Francis M. McMillen · Navy Landsman Daniel Noble · Army Private Oliver P. Rood · Army Sergeant Andrew J. Smith · Army Private William Steinmetz · Army Doctor Mary E. Walker · Army Major John F. Weston · Army Colonel James A. Williamson
Indian Campaigns (1870-1891)
Army Second Lieutenant Thomas Cruse · Army First Sergeant William L. Day · Army Corporal John J. Givens · Army Private William M. Harris · Army Captain John B. Kerr · Army Private Franklin M. McDonald · Army Private George D. Scott · Army Sergeant Thomas Shaw · Army Private Thomas W. Stivers · Army Private Thomas Sullivan · Army Saddler Otto E. Volt · Army Sergeant Brent Woods
Actions in Peacetime (1871-1910)
Navy Seaman Edward W. Boers · Navy Watertender Edward A. Clary · Navy Quarter Gunner George Holt Wars of American Expansion (1897-1902) Army Colonel J. Franklin Bell · Army First Lieutenant Benjamin F. Hardaway · Army Private James J.Nash
World War I (1917-1919)
Army Sergeant Willie Sandlin
World War II (1941-1945)
Marine Corps Corporal Richard E. Bush · Army Technical Sergeant Morris E. Crain · Marine Corps Private
Kentucky Medal Of Honor Memorial image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, May 19, 2017
3. Kentucky Medal Of Honor Memorial
( west side )
First Class Leonard F. Mason · Marine Corps Reserve Private First Class Wesley Phelps · Army Private Wilburn K. Ross · Marine Corps Private First Class Luther Skaggs, Jr · Army Staff Sergeant Junior J. Spurrier · Army Sergeant John C. Squires
Korean War (1950-1953)
Marine Corps Captain William E. Barber · Marine Corps Private First Class William B. Baugh · Army Corporal John W. Collier · Army First Lieutenant Carl H. Dodd · Army Second Lieutenant Darwin K. Kyle · Army Private First Class David M. Smith · Army Private First Class Ernest E. West
Vietnam War (1961-1975)
Army Sergeant Charles C. Fleck · Army Staff Sergeant Don Jenkins · Army Private First Class Billy L. Lauffer · Army Sergeant First Class Gary L. Littrell · Marine Corps Second Lieutenant John J. McGinty III · Army Private First Class David P. Nash · Marine Corps Lance Corporal Joe C. Paul
War in Afghanistan
Marine Corps Sergeant Dakota Meyer

 
Location. 38° 15.253′ N, 85° 45.544′ W. Marker is in Louisville, Kentucky, in Jefferson County. Marker is on W Jefferson Street near S 5th Street, on the right when traveling west. Touch for map. Located in front of Louisville Metro Hall. Marker is at or near this postal address: 527 W Jefferson Street, Louisville KY 40202, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers.
Kentucky Medal Of Honor Memorial image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, May 19, 2017
4. Kentucky Medal Of Honor Memorial
( east side )
At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Jefferson County (a few steps from this marker); They Paid For Peace (a few steps from this marker); Thomas Jefferson Memorial (within shouting distance of this marker); George Rogers Clark (within shouting distance of this marker); City and County Named / Jefferson County Courthouse (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Louis XVI (about 300 feet away); Louisville Firefighters Memorial (about 400 feet away); Louisville Law Enforcement Memorial (about 400 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Louisville.
 
Categories. Military
 
Kentucky Medal Of Honor Memorial image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, May 19, 2017
5. Kentucky Medal Of Honor Memorial
( west side )
John C. Squires-Medal of Honor grave marker image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, August 6, 2000
6. John C. Squires-Medal of Honor grave marker
He is buried in Zachary Taylor National Cemetery, Louisville KY-Section A, Site 1359. He was Killed in Action. His Medal of Honor information and citation is: *SQUIRES, JOHN C. • Rank and organization: Sergeant (then Private First Class), U.S. Army, Company A, 30th Infantry, 3d Infantry Division • Place and date: Near Padiglione, Italy, 23-24 April 1944 • Entered service at: Louisville, Ky. • G.O. No.: 78, 2 October 1944 Citation: For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at risk of life above and beyond the call of duty. At the start of his company's attack on strongly held enemy positions in and around Spaccasassi Creek, near Padiglione, Italy, on the night of 23-24 April 1944, Pfc. Squires, platoon messenger, participating in his first offensive action, braved intense artillery, mortar, and antitank gun fire in order to investigate the effects of an antitank mine explosion on the leading platoon. Despite shells which burst close to him, Pfc. Squires made his way 50 yards forward to the advance element, noted the situation, reconnoitered a new route of advance and informed his platoon leader of the casualties sustained and the alternate route. Acting without orders, he rounded up stragglers, organized a group of lost men into a squad and led them forward. When the platoon reached Spaccasassi Creek and established an outpost, Pfc. Squires, knowing that almost all of the noncommissioned officers were casualties, placed 8 men in position of his own volition, disregarding enemy machinegun, machine-pistol, and grenade fire which covered the creek draw. When his platoon had been reduced to 14 men, he brought up reinforcements twice. On each trip he went through barbed wire and across an enemy minefield, under intense artillery and mortar fire. Three times in the early morning the outpost was counterattacked. Each time Pfc. Squires ignored withering enemy automatic fire and grenades which struck all around him, and fired hundreds of rounds of rifle, Browning automatic rifle, and captured German Spandau machinegun ammunition at the enemy, inflicting numerous casualties and materially aiding in repulsing the attacks. Following these fights, he moved 50 yards to the south end of the outpost and engaged 21 German soldiers in individual machinegun duels at point-blank range, forcing all 21 enemy to surrender and capturing 13 more Spandau guns. Learning the function of this weapon by questioning a German officer prisoner, he placed the captured guns in position and instructed other members of his platoon in their operation. The next night when the Germans attacked the outpost again he killed 3 and wounded more Germans with captured potato-masher grenades and fire from his Spandau gun. Pfc. Squires was killed in a subsequent action.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 22, 2017. This page originally submitted on June 18, 2017, by Michael Herrick of Southbury, Connecticut. This page has been viewed 88 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on June 18, 2017, by Michael Herrick of Southbury, Connecticut.   6. submitted on June 21, 2017, by Don Morfe of Baltimore, Md 21234.
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