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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Scranton in Lackawanna County, Pennsylvania — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

The Lackawanna Valley

 
 
The Lackawanna Valley Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, July 25, 2008
1. The Lackawanna Valley Marker
Inscription. The Lackawanna Valley seemed to have all the advantages for an ironworks - raw materials, waterpower, and topography.

"This is a marvelous place. Only two years ago it was a wilderness... But the eye of speculation and improvement was on it, and a furnace was erected between the hills and upon the stream. The mines for coal to be used in this establishment, are within a biscuit toss of the doors of the furnace, and the ore is obtained on the opposite hill. The lime stone is less easily obtained..."
Wilkes-Barre Advocate, September 4, 1844

Ore was first mined from the hill across Roaring Brook. However, this ore was difficult to extract and mines were opened on the south sided of Moosic Mountain. Coal was poor in quality; so new mines were opened on nearby mountains. Mules brought the coal and ore to the furnace.

Anthracite fueled iron furnaces require a blast of hot air to smelt the iron ore. A dam and waterwheel were constructed on Roaring Brook to provide power to the bellows blowing air into the furnace. The blast furnaces were built on the side of a hill so they could be loaded from the top. The ore, coal, and limestone were dumped into an opening in the chimney. The slag, or waste, and the molten iron were tapped from openings at the base of the furnace. Slag and ash from the furnaces were used to
The Lackawanna Valley Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, July 25, 2008
2. The Lackawanna Valley Marker
The marker is under a shade protecting the top of a furnace chimney.
fill in the marsh, in today's downtown Scranton.
 
Location. 41° 24.237′ N, 75° 39.756′ W. Marker is in Scranton, Pennsylvania, in Lackawanna County. Marker can be reached from the intersection of Cedar Avenue and Mattes Avenue, on the right when traveling north. Touch for map. Located at the Scranton's Iron Furnace Park. Marker is in this post office area: Scranton PA 18505, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Settlement ( here, next to this marker); Making Steel ( a few steps from this marker); City of Scranton ( a few steps from this marker); Rolling and Puddling ( a few steps from this marker); Casting Iron ( within shouting distance of this marker); Supplying the Blast ( within shouting distance of this marker); Scranton Iron Furnaces ( within shouting distance of this marker); The Blast Furnaces ( about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Scranton.
 
More about this marker. On the left is "View of the Lackawanna Coal and Iron Company Furnaces" by George Clough, 1859. In the center, a photo from a coal mine shows a "Driver and Mule." On the right is a drawing from Harpers Weekly from February 22, 1873, captioned "Down among the coal miners - going down the
Roaring Brook Today image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, July 25, 2008
3. Roaring Brook Today
slope."
Also on the right is a photo of the blast furnaces when in operation.
 
Categories. Industry & Commerce
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on August 21, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 749 times since then and 26 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on August 21, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.
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