Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Dayton in Montgomery County, Ohio — The American Midwest (Great Lakes)
 

Mount Enon Missionary Baptist Church / Euclid Avenue United Brethren Church

 
 
Mount Enon Missionary Baptist Church Marker image. Click for full size.
By Rev. Ronald Irick, July 18, 2017
1. Mount Enon Missionary Baptist Church Marker
Inscription.
Mount Enon Missionary Baptist Church

Led by Rev.W.E. Jones, a small band of baptized believers came together for services in January 1925. They met regularly in a residence on Home Avenue and Hawthorne Streets, later moving to Summit Street. Becoming the Mount Enon Missionary Baptist Church (MEMBC), the congregation grew and purchased its first church on Germantown and Bank Streets in 1926, later moving to College Street and Mercer Avenue in 1947. The congregation purchased the former Euclid Street United Brethren Church in 1962. The MEMBC’s motto is “Because WeCcare, We Share” and serves the community through its many social and educational programs.

Euclid Avenue United Brethren Church
The-Euclid Avenue United Brethren Church, later the Mount Enon Missionary Baptist Church, was erected at Third & Euclid Street in Dayton. Milton Wright, a bishop of the church, was present at the laying of the cornerstone on May 28, 1911. Bishop and Mrs. Susan (Koerner) Wright were the parents of Orville and Wilbur Wright and their siblings Reuchlin, Lorin, and Katherine. The church’s congregation included Orville and Katherine Wright and other notable Daytonians such as local historian and former pastor Dr. Augustus W. Drury, food distributor and potato chip maker Daniel Mikesell, and Prof. Joseph P.

Euclid Avenue United Brethren Church  Marker image. Click for full size.
By Rev. Ronald Irick, 718/2017
2. Euclid Avenue United Brethren Church Marker
Landis of the Bonebrake Theological Seminary. The church played a role in offering aid during the disastrous flood of 1913.
 
Erected 2015 by Wright Brothers Family Foundation The Grace Bell and Emma English Family Mt. Enon Missionary Baptist Church The Ohio History Connection. (Marker Number 20- 57.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Ohio Historical Society / The Ohio History Connection marker series.
 
Location. 39° 45.289′ N, 84° 13.267′ W. Marker is in Dayton, Ohio, in Montgomery County. Marker is at the intersection of Third Street and North Euclid Avenue, on the right when traveling west on Third Street. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 1501 W 3rd St, Dayton OH 45402, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Rising to the Challenge (approx. ¼ mile away); Making His Way With Words (approx. ¼ mile away); Coming Home (approx. ¼ mile away); Paul Laurence Dunbar (approx. ¼ mile away); The Professor of the Propeller (approx. 0.4 miles away); Orville's Last Workshop (approx. 0.4 miles away); 31 Years at the Lab (approx. 0.4 miles away); West Side (approx. half a mile away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Dayton.
 
Additional keywords.
Mount Enon Missionary Baptist Church Marker image. Click for full size.
By Rev. Ronald Irick, July 18, 2017
3. Mount Enon Missionary Baptist Church Marker
Wright Brothers Ohio History Connection 1913 Flood
 
Categories. African AmericansChurches & ReligionDisasters
 
Mount Enon Missionary Baptist Church Marker image. Click for full size.
By Rev. Ronald Irick, July 18, 2017
4. Mount Enon Missionary Baptist Church Marker
detail of picture on marker; the building
Mount Enon Missionary Baptist Church Marker image. Click for full size.
By Rev. Ronald Irick, July 18, 2017
5. Mount Enon Missionary Baptist Church Marker
detail of picture on marker; the charter members
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on July 19, 2017. This page originally submitted on July 18, 2017, by Rev. Ronald Irick of West Liberty, Ohio. This page has been viewed 67 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on July 18, 2017, by Rev. Ronald Irick of West Liberty, Ohio. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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