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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Westworth Village in Tarrant County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

Horace Seaver Carswell, Jr.

Major, United States Army Air Corps

 
 
Horace Seaver Carswell, Jr. Texas Historical Marker image. Click for full size.
By QuesterMark, July 6, 2017
1. Horace Seaver Carswell, Jr. Texas Historical Marker
Inscription. Horace Seaver Carswell, Jr. was born on July 18, 1916, to Horace S. and Bertha Rea Carswell of Fort Worth. He attended North Side High School where he excelled in athletics. Graduating in 1934, Carswell entered Texas A&M College and later transferred to Texas Christian University, where he lettered in football and baseball and graduated with a degree in Physical Education in 1939.

In 1940, Carswell enlisted in the U.S. Army Air Corps as a Flying Cadet. He undertook Primary Flight Training in Tulsa, Oklahoma, and at Randolph Field (San Antonio), and Advanced Flying Training at Kelly Field (San Antonio). Upon receiving his wings in November 1940 he served at Randolph Field and Goodfellow Field (San Angelo) where he met and later married Virginia Ede in October 1941. Two months later the U.S. entered World War II.

Carswell served in stateside assignments until April 1944, when he was transferred to the China-Burma-India Theater of Operations and to the 374th Bombardment Squadron, 308th Bombardment Group. Major Carswell commanded a unit of radar-equipped B-24J bombers at Liuchow, China. On October 26, 1944, he led a nighttime interdiction mission over the South China Sea. While attacking an enemy convoy, his aircraft was severely damaged by Japanese anti-aircraft fire. Carswell nursed his aircraft to the China coast
Airfield Falls Conservation Park and Horace Seaver Carswell, Jr. Marker image. Click for full size.
By QuesterMark, July 6, 2017
2. Airfield Falls Conservation Park and Horace Seaver Carswell, Jr. Marker
This marker, as well as another, can be seen through the gateway.
where he ordered his crew to parachute to safety. When two of his crew could not bail out, he selflessly remained with his aircraft, searching for a spot to land until the damaged plane crashed into a mountainside. Carswell was posthumously awarded the Medal of Honor, which was presented to his wife and young son. In 1948, his remains were repatriated and buried in Fort Worth. That same year, Army Air Field was renamed Carswell Air Force Base in his honor. Its airstrip is still officially named "Carswell Field."
Marker is Property of the State of Texas

 
Erected 2016 by Texas Historical Commission. (Marker Number 18384.)
 
Location. 32° 45.774′ N, 97° 25.228′ W. Marker is in Westworth Village, Texas, in Tarrant County. Marker can be reached from Pumphrey Drive 0.2 miles north of Westworth Boulevard (State Highway 183), on the right when traveling north. Touch for map. This marker stands within Airfield Falls Conservation Park. Marker is at or near this postal address: 200 Pumphrey Dr, Fort Worth TX 76114, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 4 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Fort Worth Army Air Field (here, next to this marker); Curzon Place (approx.
Horace Seaver Carswell, Jr. and Fort Worth Army Air Field Markers image. Click for full size.
By QuesterMark, July 6, 2017
3. Horace Seaver Carswell, Jr. and Fort Worth Army Air Field Markers
Airfield Falls Conservation Park
2.3 miles away); Camp Bowie Boulevard (approx. 2.7 miles away); Camp Bowie in World War I (approx. 2.7 miles away); Midnight (approx. 3.3 miles away); Herbert M. Hinckley (approx. 3.4 miles away); Southwestern Exposition and Livestock Show (approx. 3.5 miles away); Raymond C. Morrison (approx. 3.8 miles away).
 
Categories. War, World II
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on July 31, 2017. This page originally submitted on July 28, 2017, by QuesterMark of Fort Worth, Texas. This page has been viewed 50 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on July 28, 2017, by QuesterMark of Fort Worth, Texas. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
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