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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Saint Boniface, Manitoba — The Canadian Prairies
 

The Five Saint Boniface Cathedrals

 
 
The First Chapel and Second Church/First Cathedral Marker image. Click for full size.
By Kevin Craft, July 9, 2017
1. The First Chapel and Second Church/First Cathedral Marker
Inscription.
1818-1825 First Chapel
When the first two Catholic missionaries arrived at the Red River settlement, much work awaited them. Father Provencher constructed a modest log structure to serve as rectory, church and boys' school.
1825-1839 Second Church
First Cathedral
Right from the outset, father Provencher planned a larger building to serve the spiritual needs of the colony and represent the Church in the West. It took six years to raise the funds and complete the second church. Father Provencher was appointed bishop in 1822 and this church became thus the first St. Boniface Cathedral.
1839- 1862
Second Cathedral
The population of the colony was growing. Bishop Provencher decided to build a larger cathedral, a stone building which was completed in 1839. Sir George Simpson, governor of the Hudson's Bay Company, provided a grant of 100 pounds sterling and the services of Scottish stone masons to complete the twin-towered building, immortalized in the poem "Red River Voyageur" by American poet J.G. Whittier in 1859. Fire destroyed this structure in 1860.
1862-1908
Third Cathedral
Bishop Tache undertook the construction of a third Cathedral, built of stone with one bell tower, smaller than the previous one. It was used for 45 years
The Second Cathedral Marker image. Click for full size.
By Kevin Craft, July 9, 2017
2. The Second Cathedral Marker
until the construction of what would become the biggest Cathedral in Western Canada. The last two decades of the nineteenth century were marked by a rapid growth of the city and, due to the increase of the population a larger building was needed. This church was demolished after the construction of the 4th Cathedral.
1908-1968
Fourth Cathedral
Archbishop Langevin succeeded Archbishop Tache in 1894 and the construction of a new cathedral started in 1905. Completed in three years, it was the most impressive building to date. Designed by the Montreal architectural firm of Marchand and Haskell in the Roman-byzantine style, it featured a 25 foot stained glass rosette and seated about 2000 people. Joseph Senecal led to construction which cost $325,000 at the time. On July 22, 1968 this building was destroyed by fire.
1972
Fifth Cathedral
Before the ashes had cooled, the reconstruction project was being planned as Archbishop Baudoux was receiving cash and pledges from the parishioners. Franco-Manitoban architect Étienne Gaboury designed a new modern building, incorporated inside the walls and towers of the previous church to both meet the needs of the congregation and preserve the heritage of the past.
 
Location. 49° 53.337′ N, 97° 7.416′ W. Marker
The Third Cathedral Marker image. Click for full size.
By Kevin Craft, July 9, 2017
3. The Third Cathedral Marker
is in Saint Boniface, Manitoba. Marker is on Tache Avenue 0.1 kilometers south of Avenue de la Cathedrale, on the right when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker(s) are part of a large marble monument. Marker is in this post office area: Saint Boniface, Manitoba R2H 0H7, Canada.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 26 kilometers of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Forks of the Red and Assiniboine (approx. 0.3 kilometers away); The Creation of Manitoba (approx. 0.3 kilometers away); The Path of Time (approx. 0.4 kilometers away); Canadian Northern Railway Freight Lift Bridge, East Yard (approx. half a kilometer away); Twin Oaks (approx. 20.9 kilometers away); St. Andrew’s Rectory (approx. 22.3 kilometers away); St. Andrews Anglican Church (approx. 22.4 kilometers away); St. Andrews Caméré Curtain Dam (approx. 25.2 kilometers away).
 
Also see . . .
1. Wikipedia - Saint Boniface Cathedral. (Submitted on August 3, 2017, by Kevin Craft of Bedford, Quebec.)
2. Saint Boniface Cathedrals - A short history. (Submitted on August 3, 2017, by Kevin Craft of Bedford, Quebec.)
3. Saint Boniface Cathedral fire of 1968. (Submitted on August 3, 2017, by Kevin Craft of Bedford, Quebec.)
 
Categories. Churches, Etc.Notable Buildings
 
The Fourth Cathedral Marker image. Click for full size.
By Kevin Craft, July 9, 2017
4. The Fourth Cathedral Marker
The Fifth Cathedral Marker image. Click for full size.
By Kevin Craft, July 9, 2017
5. The Fifth Cathedral Marker
The preserved facade of Saint Boniface Cathedral #4 image. Click for full size.
By Kevin Craft, July 9, 2017
6. The preserved facade of Saint Boniface Cathedral #4
Cathedral #5 is visible behind the facade.
The Fifth Saint Boniface Cathedral image. Click for full size.
By Kevin Craft, July 9, 2017
7. The Fifth Saint Boniface Cathedral
Forever remembered image. Click for full size.
By Kevin Craft, July 9, 2017
8. Forever remembered
This memorial is meant as a tribute to all the "unknown" people buried in this cemetery since 1818, all those whose memory isn't kept on a tombstone: people of the First Nations, Métis, French Canadians, Scots, Irish...This cemetery is the resting place of more than 6000 people.
Along with all those who have left their name in history, these pioneers have contributed to build this country and have opened the way for all of us who live here today. May they rest in peace in this sacred ground and historical landmark.
St. Boniface Cathedral image. Click for full size.
Postcard published by Valentine and Sons, circa 1910
9. St. Boniface Cathedral
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on August 3, 2017. This page originally submitted on August 3, 2017, by Kevin Craft of Bedford, Quebec. This page has been viewed 68 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8. submitted on August 3, 2017, by Kevin Craft of Bedford, Quebec.   9. submitted on August 3, 2017.
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