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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Capitol Hill in Washington, District of Columbia — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Marine Barracks, Washington, D.C.

“Oldest Post of the Corps”

 
 
Marine Barracks, Washington, D.C. Marker image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, August 5, 2008
1. Marine Barracks, Washington, D.C. Marker
Inscription. Site selected by President Thomas Jefferson and Lieutenant Colonel Commandant William Ward Burrows on 31 March 1801.

A National Capital Landmark and entered in the National Register of Historic Places.

United States Marine Corps

 
Marker series. This marker is included in the National Historic Landmarks marker series.
 
Location. 38° 52.779′ N, 76° 59.688′ W. Marker is in Capitol Hill, District of Columbia, in Washington. Marker is on 8th Street, SE near I Street, SE. Touch for map. Marker is at the Barracks' main entrance, on the gate post opposite the National Historic Landmark marker, a few yards north of the famous intersection of "Eighth and Eye". Marker is in this post office area: Washington DC 20390, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Strike Up the Band (within shouting distance of this marker); Oldest Post of the Corps (about 700 feet away, measured in a direct line); A Neighborhood For Everyone (about 700 feet away); William Prout: Community Builder (about 700 feet away); John Philip Sousa (approx. 0.2 miles away); Christ Church and Its Parishioners
U.S. Marine Corps Barracks and Commandant's House image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, August 5, 2008
2. U.S. Marine Corps Barracks and Commandant's House
Entered in the National Register of Historic Places in 1972, and subsequently designated a National Historic Landmark by the Department of the Interior in 1976.
(approx. 0.2 miles away); Washington Navy Yard: Serving the Fleet (approx. 0.2 miles away); In the Alley (approx. 0.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Capitol Hill.
 
Also see . . .
1. Buried Treasure at Eighth and Eye. In August 1814, as the British Army approached Washington, two sergeants of the detachment at Marine Headquarters (then located at the Marine Barracks) were, so the story goes, charged with the safety of a chest containing a considerable amount of Marine Corps funds. The Marines were supposed to have buried the chest on the grounds of the barracks or to have hidden it within the walls of the Commandant's House. They then rejoined their comrades on the battlefield of Bladensburg where they were killed in the fighting, taking the secret of the money's location with them to the grave.

In another version of this story, the two NCO's were killed in a rugged floor-to-floor defense of the Commandant's House when the British invaders reached Washington. Treasure seekers still eye the walled barracks and hoary house with longing, for the money has never been found and may still be, as legend has it, waiting for the persistent hunter. (Submitted on August 7, 2008, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.)
Main Gate, Marine Barracks, Washington, D.C. image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, August 5, 2008
3. Main Gate, Marine Barracks, Washington, D.C.
 

2. USMC Barracks during the Civil War. (Submitted on November 9, 2011, by Steven Berkowitz of Annnandale, Virginia.)
3. Wikipedia entry for the Marine Barracks, Washington, D.C. (Submitted on August 6, 2008, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.)
 
Additional keywords. Commandant's House
 
Categories. MilitaryNotable PersonsNotable PlacesWar of 1812
 
"Barracks Row," 8th Street, SE image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, August 5, 2008
4. "Barracks Row," 8th Street, SE
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on September 10, 2016. This page originally submitted on August 6, 2008, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland. This page has been viewed 3,993 times since then and 78 times this year. Last updated on August 29, 2008, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on August 6, 2008, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland. • Kevin W. was the editor who published this page.
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