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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Southwest in Washington, District of Columbia — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

The Williams Slave Pen

 
 
The Williams Slave Pen Marker image. Click for full size.
October 16, 2017
1. The Williams Slave Pen Marker
Inscription. "Underneath the roof there was a crazy loft all round, where slaves, if so disposed, might sleep at night, or in inclement weather seek shelter from the storm. It was like a farmer's barnyard in most respects, safe it was so constructed that the outside world could never see the human cattle that were herded there." Solomon Northrup (1853)

Williams Slave Pen
An infamous slave pen, owned by W.H. Williams, once stood near the corner of 7th Street and Independence Avenue (formerly B Street), Southwest. A seemingly innocuous yellow house, set back from the street in a grove of trees, concealed from view a brick-walled yard, in which enslaved persons were held, awaiting transport to southern markets. It was one of the most lucrative of the slave pens operating in Washington, DC in the years before the Civil War. Williams had purchased an existing slave pen because of its advantageous location on 7th Street, with direct access to the District's waterfront shipping piers on the Potomac River.

In 1841, Solomon Northup, a free Black man and professional musician, was drugged, kidnapped, and sold as a slave while visiting Washington, DC to attend the funeral of President William Henry Harrison. Eventually, Northup regained his freedom and documented the experience in his book, Twelve Years a Slave: Narrative
The Williams Slave Pen Marker image. Click for full size.
October 16, 2017
2. The Williams Slave Pen Marker
This image of a Southwest DC slave pen is from a broadside published in 1836 by the American Anti-Slavery Society condemning the sale of humans into slavery.
of Solomon Northup
(1853). The book includes a firsthand account of the Williams Slave Pen, where Northup was imprisoned:

"The yard extended rearward from the house about thirty feet. In one part of the wall there was a strongly ironed door, opening into a narrow, covered passage, leading along one side of the house into the street. The doom of the colored man, upon who the door leading out of that narrow passage closed, was sealed. The top of the wall supported one end of a roof, which ascended inwards forming a kind of open shed. Underneath the roof there was a crazy loft all round, where slaves, if so disposed, might sleep at night, or in inclement weather seek shelter from the storm. It was like a farmer's barnyard in most respects, save it was so constructed that the outside world could never see the human cattle that were herded there.

The building to which the yard was attached, was two stories high, fronting on one of the public streets of Washington, its outside presented only the appearance of a quiet private residence. A stranger looking at it, would never have dreamed of its execrable uses. Strange as it may seem, within plain sight of this same house, looking down from its commanding height upon it, was the Capitol."

 
Erected by U.S. General Services Administration.
 
Location.
The Williams Slave Pen Marker image. Click for full size.
October 16, 2017
3. The Williams Slave Pen Marker
38° 53.237′ N, 77° 1.338′ W. Marker is in Southwest, District of Columbia, in Washington. Marker is on Independence Avenue SW west of 7th Street SW, on the right when traveling east. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 800 Independence Avenue SW, Washington DC 20591, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The Slave Trade in Washington, DC (here, next to this marker); 320th Bomb Group (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); First International Manned Space Mission (about 400 feet away); Earth Day Park (about 500 feet away); Uranus (about 500 feet away); Arts and Industries Building (about 800 feet away); a different marker also named Arts and Industries Building (was approx. 0.2 miles away but has been reported missing. ); T.S.C. Lowe's Observation Flight (approx. 0.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Southwest.
 
Categories. African Americans
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on October 17, 2017. This page originally submitted on October 16, 2017, by Devry Becker Jones of Silver Spring, Maryland. This page has been viewed 77 times since then. Photos:   1. submitted on October 16, 2017.   2. submitted on October 16, 2017, by Devry Becker Jones of Silver Spring, Maryland.   3. submitted on October 16, 2017. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
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