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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Gibbonsville in Lemhi County, Idaho — The American West (Mountains)
 

Gibbonsville

 
 
Gibbonsville Marker image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, June 24, 2017
1. Gibbonsville Marker
Inscription. British investment in a large Gibbonsville mine after 1880 made this an important gold camp until 1899.
Discovery of a major lode here in 1877 and construction of a good wagon road to a Utah and Northern Railway terminal in Montana brought prosperity when mining was not suspended because of litigation. With close to 100 buildings, two saw mills, a roller mill, five stamp mills, a newspaper, and six to eight saloons, Gibbonsville produced about $2,000,000 in gold.
 
Erected by Idaho Department of Transportation. (Marker Number 243.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Idaho State Historical Society marker series.
 
Location. 45° 32.598′ N, 113° 55.767′ W. Marker is near Gibbonsville, Idaho, in Lemhi County. Marker is on Casey Road (U.S. 93) near Dahlonega Creek Road (Forest Road 079), on the left when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 3223 Casey Road, Gibbonsville ID 83463, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 10 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Deep Creek (approx. 3.8 miles away); Nez Perce Trail (approx. 4.8 miles away); Lewis and Clark (approx. 8.4
Gibbonsville Marker image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, June 24, 2017
2. Gibbonsville Marker
miles away); Lost Trail Pass (approx. 9.7 miles away); Jerry Fahey’s Cutoff (approx. 9.7 miles away); In Commemoration of Old Toby the Shoshone Indian (approx. 9.9 miles away); Salmon River Encounter (approx. 10 miles away); a different marker also named Lewis and Clark (approx. 10.1 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Gibbonsville.
 
Also see . . .  Gibbnsville, Idaho Mining Camp to Bedroom Community - Legends of America. he first settlers made their homes here about 1872, at which time the tiny spot was referred to as Dahlongi. However, in 1877, after gold was discovered on Anderson and Dahlonega Creeks, the small settlement officially became a town and was named Gibbonsville in honor of Colonel John Gibbon, who pursued the Nez Perce Indians and fought in the Battle of the Big Hole. (Submitted on November 5, 2017, by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California.) 
 
Categories. Industry & CommerceNatural Resources
 
Gibbonsville, Idaho image. Click for full size.
By Unknown, circa 1910
3. Gibbonsville, Idaho
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on November 5, 2017. This page originally submitted on November 5, 2017, by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California. This page has been viewed 61 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on November 5, 2017, by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California.
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