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Logan Circle in Washington, District of Columbia — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Care for the City

A Fitting Tribute

 

—Logan Circle Heritage Trail —

 
Care for the City Marker image. Click for full size.
By Devry Becker Jones, December 2, 2017
1. Care for the City Marker
Inscription.

Luther Place Memorial Church has been a neighborhood fixture since 1873, when the Maryland Synod of the Evangelical Lutheran Church established it as a "memorial to God's goodness in delivering the land from slavery and from war." It quickly established a reputation for community service. A century later, this very urban church was galvanized by civil disturbances following the 1968 assassination of the Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Place offered shelter during and after the riots, and provided food, clothing and medical care for thousands of affected people.

With the 1970 arrival of the Reverend John Steinbruck, the church expanded its social justice program. New women's shelters eventually became N Street Village, a community of empowerment and recovery for homeless and low-income women. Luther Place hosted the Community for Creative Non-Violence, which operated Zacchaeus Medical Clinic, housing for offenders awaiting trial, and a group residence. Zacchaeus later merged with Bread for the City, which was organized by Luther Place in 1976. The church declared itself a sanctuary for refugees of the war in El Salvador (1979-1992).

Social justice leaders, including Harriet Tubman, Dietrich Bonhoeffer, Dr. King, Dorothy Day, and St. Francis of Assissi are memorialized in stained-glass windows and
Care for the City Marker image. Click for full size.
By Devry Becker Jones, December 2, 2017
2. Care for the City Marker
outdoor murals. The church building was listed in the National Register of Historic Places in 1973.

Just behind you, near the intersection of Vermont Avenue and N Street, is where the organizing meeting for what would be Howard University took place in 1867. Dr. Charles B. Boynton of the First Congregational Society hosted the meeting in his home (since demolished).

Reverse:
The Logan Circle Neighborhood began with city boosters' dreams of greatness. The troops, cattle pens, and hubbub of the Civil War (1861-1865) had nearly ruined Washington, and when the fighting ended, Congress threatened to move the nation's capital elsewhere. So city leaders raced to repair and modernize the city. As paved streets, waster and gas lines, street lights, and sewers reached undeveloped areas, wealthy whites followed. Mansions soon sprang up around an elegant park where Vermont and Rhode Island Avenues met. The circle was named Iowa Circle, thanks to Iowa Senator William Boyd Allison. In 1901 a statue of Civil War General (and later Senator) John A. Logan, a founder of Memorial Day, replaced the park's central fountain. The circle took his name in 1930. The title of this Heritage Trail comes from General Logan's argument that Memorial Day would serve as "a fitting tribute to the memory of [the nation's] slain defenders."

As the city grew beyond
Care for the City Marker image. Click for full size.
By Devry Becker Jones, December 2, 2017
3. Care for the City Marker
Logan Circle, affluent African Americans gradually replaced whites here. Most of them moved on during World War II, and their mansions were divided into rooming houses to meet a wartime housing shortage. By the 1960s, with suburban Maryland and Virginia drawing investment, much of the neighborhood had decayed. When civil disturbances erupted after the 1968 assassination of the Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., it hit bottom. Ten years later, however, long-time residents, newcomers, and new city programs spurred revival. A Fitting Tribute: Logan Circle Heritage Trail takes you through the neighborhood's lofty and low times to introduce the array of individuals who shaped its modern vitality.
 
Erected 2012 by Cultural Tourism DC. (Marker Number 12 of 15.)
 
Location. 38° 54.391′ N, 77° 1.894′ W. Marker is in Logan Circle, District of Columbia, in Washington. Marker is at the intersection of Vermont Avenue Northwest and Logan Circle NW, on the left when traveling north on Vermont Avenue Northwest. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 1226 Vermont Avenue NW, Washington DC 20005, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The Presidents' Church (within shouting distance of this marker); Major General George H. Thomas
Dorothy Day Mural image. Click for full size.
By Devry Becker Jones, December 2, 2017
4. Dorothy Day Mural

Don't call me a saint... I don't want to be dismissed so easily.
St. Dorothy of New York
(about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Striving for Equality (about 700 feet away); Bethune Museum-Archives (about 800 feet away); It Takes a Village (approx. 0.2 miles away); The Artistic Life (approx. 0.2 miles away); This House was Occupied by Alexander Graham Bell (approx. 0.2 miles away); The Church of the Ascension and St. Agnes (approx. 0.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Logan Circle.
 
Categories. African AmericansCharity & Public WorkChurches & Religion
 
St. Francis of Assissi Mural image. Click for full size.
By Devry Becker Jones, December 2, 2017
5. St. Francis of Assissi Mural

St. Francis of Assisi
All praise to you, oh Lord
for all these brother and sister creatures.
Martin Luther Statue in front of Luther Place Memorial Church image. Click for full size.
By Devry Becker Jones, December 2, 2017
6. Martin Luther Statue in front of Luther Place Memorial Church
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on December 12, 2017. This page originally submitted on December 2, 2017, by Devry Becker Jones of Silver Spring, Maryland. This page has been viewed 43 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on December 2, 2017, by Devry Becker Jones of Silver Spring, Maryland. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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