Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Marshall in Harrison County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

Sam Houston's 1857 Campaign in Marshall

 
 
Sam Houston's 1857 Campaign in Marshall Marker image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 24, 2014
1. Sam Houston's 1857 Campaign in Marshall Marker
Inscription. On May 23, 1857, during his first Texas gubernatorial race, Sam Houston came to Marshall, the hometown of two of his most outspoken critics, Robert Lougery and Louis T. Wigfall, for a much anticipated debate against his opponent, Hardin Runnels. Here under an oak tree in an overwhelmingly secessionist area, the Unionist Houston spoke so eloquently that Runnels, who was scheduled to follow, declined to speak. Though he lost the election, Houston's stirring oratory brought him forty-eight percent of the Harrison County vote.
 
Erected 1991 by Texas Historical Commission.
 
Location. 32° 32.863′ N, 94° 22.142′ W. Marker is in Marshall, Texas, in Harrison County. Marker is at the intersection of West Burleson Street and North Franklin Street, on the right when traveling west on West Burleson Street. Touch for map. Marker is located along the sidewalk in front of Marshall's First Church of Christ Scientist. Marker is at or near this postal address: 213 West Burleson Street, Marshall TX 75670, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Site of Marshall Masonic Female Institute (here, next to this marker); Site of The Confederate Hat Factory in Marshall, C.S.A. (about
Sam Houston's 1857 Campaign in Marshall Marker (<i>wide view showing adjacent marker</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 24, 2014
2. Sam Houston's 1857 Campaign in Marshall Marker (wide view showing adjacent marker)
400 feet away, measured in a direct line); Telegraph Park (approx. 0.2 miles away); Harrison County (approx. 0.2 miles away); Marshall (approx. 0.2 miles away); James Harper Starr (approx. 0.2 miles away); General Elkanah Greer / Knights of the Golden Circle (approx. 0.2 miles away); Governor Edward Clark (approx. 0.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Marshall.
 
Also see . . .
1. Samuel Houston.
As a lame-duck senator, Houston ran for governor of Texas in 1857. He was defeated in a rigorous campaign by the state Democratic Party's official nominee, Hardin R. Runnels. So concerned was Houston about sectional strife that during his final year in the Senate he advocated establishing a protectorate over Mexico and Central America as a way to bring unity to the United States. A passionate Unionist like his mentor Andrew Jackson, Houston wore a leopard skin waistcoat to symbolize that he would not change his spots. Out of the Senate, Houston ran a second time for governor in 1859. Because of his name recognition, a temporary lull in the sectional conflict, and other factors, he defeated the incumbent, Runnels, in the August election and assumed office on December 21. (Submitted on December 2, 2017, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

2. Sam Houston.
Sam Houston ran twice for Texas governor, first in 1857 and, successfully, in 1859. He thus became the only person so far to serve as governor of two states. Just as in Tennessee, however, he resigned the office. The Texas Secession Convention replaced him with Lt. Governor Edward Clark on March 16, 1861, when Houston refused to take the oath of allegiance to the Confederate States of America. Although he opposed Texas' withdrawal from the Union, Houston also refused to use military force to counter secession. (Submitted on December 2, 2017, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

3. Hardin R. Runnels.
In May 1857 the state Democratic party held its first convention at which a gubernatorial candidate was nominated. Leading Democrats, angered by Sam Houston's votes in the United States Senate and his seeming endorsement of the American (Know-Nothing) party in 1856, wished to prevent Houston's election as governor. Because of his support of Southern positions and his party loyalty, Runnels received the nomination on the eighth ballot. Shortly thereafter, Houston announced his candidacy as an independent Democrat, saying that the issues were "Houston and Anti-Houston." Runnels was a poor public speaker and made few appearances, but the party's candidate for lieutenant governor, Francis R. Lubbock, campaigned actively. Houston also campaigned vigorously, but had no party machinery and little support from Texas newspapers. Runnels won by a vote of 38,552 to 23,628 and thus became the only person ever to defeat Sam Houston in an election. (Submitted on December 2, 2017, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 
 
Categories. Patriots & PatriotismPolitics
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on December 5, 2017. This page originally submitted on December 2, 2017, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 84 times since then. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on December 2, 2017, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. • Andrew Ruppenstein was the editor who published this page.
Paid Advertisement