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Bandera in Bandera County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

Bandera County Courthouse

 
 
Bandera County Courthouse Marker image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 28, 2014
1. Bandera County Courthouse Marker
Inscription.
First permanent courthouse for county, which was organized in 1856, but used makeshift quarters for offices and courtrooms until this building was erected 1890-91. Style is local version of the Second Renaissance Revival. White limestone for the structure was quarried locally. B.F. Trester of San Antonio drew the plans - for $5. Contractors: Ed Braden & Sons. Interior was remodeled and a wing added in 1966.
Recorded Texas Historic Landmark - 1972

 
Erected 1972 by State Historical Survey Committee. (Marker Number 291.)
 
Location. 29° 43.597′ N, 99° 4.368′ W. Marker is in Bandera, Texas, in Bandera County. Marker is on Main Street (State Highway 173) north of Hackberry Street, on the right when traveling north. Touch for map. Mounted on subject building just right of the main entrance. Marker is at or near this postal address: 504 Main Street, Bandera TX 78003, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 5 other markers are within 12 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Camp Montel C.S.A. / Texas Civil War Frontier Defense (within shouting distance of this marker); Old Huffmeyer Store (approx. 0.2 miles away); Bandera Pass
Bandera County Courthouse (<i>marker visible right of entrance</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 28, 2014
2. Bandera County Courthouse (marker visible right of entrance)
(approx. 9.4 miles away); One Mile to Ruins of Camp Verde (approx. 11.7 miles away); Penateka Comanches (approx. 11.7 miles away).
 
Also see . . .
1. Bandera County Courthouse.
This elegant 1890 Renaissance revival courthouse designed by B.F. Trester was built of native rusticated limestone. (Submitted on December 8, 2017, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

2. Bandera County Courthouse and Jail.
The Bandera County Courthouse, built in 1890 at the corner of Main and Pecan streets, is a Renaissance Revival style building designed by San Antonio architect B.F. Trester. It is three-story building with a central clock tower made from rusticated limestone cut from a local quarry. The current jail is a non-historic, modern facility located along State Highway 16 on the north end of town. (Submitted on December 8, 2017, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

3. Bandera County History.
The first Europeans to set foot in what is now Bandera County were the Spanish, who probably explored the region in the early eighteenth century. Bandera is Spanish for "flag," and there are a number of colorful accounts as to how the county was named. One has it that a Spanish general named Bandera led a punitive expedition in the area against the Apaches after the Indians raided San Antonio de Bxar. Another relates that after pursuing the Indians to Bandera Pass the Spanish left a flag or flags to
Bandera County Courthouse (<i>corner view</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 28, 2014
3. Bandera County Courthouse (corner view)
warn them against future raids. And a third legend claims that in 1752 (or 1732) a council was held between Spanish and Indian leaders, during which the Spanish pledged never to go north of the pass if the Indians agreed to cease their raids in the south, and a red flag was placed on the pass as a symbol of the treaty. (Submitted on December 8, 2017, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

4. Amasa Clark.
Amasa Clark is celebrated as Bandera's first permanent settler. He lived to be 101 and had a total of 19 children. He survived an attack by robbers along the road to San Antonio, a traumatic drought and an equally traumatic flood and started a successful business, "Elmdale Nursery," where hundreds of his pear trees still stand today. His ranch has been recognized in a Texas Family Land Heritage Program. "Old Man Clark" attributed his long life to the healthy climate of Bandera County and to the healthy lifestyle-no tobacco or alcohol. At age 101, he rode his horse to town to vote and still worked his farm (Submitted on December 8, 2017, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

5. Cowboy Capital of the World.
Given that Bandera's early history was carved-literally-from cypress wood, why has Bandera become known as "the Cowboy Capital of the World?" Some claim the large number of dude ranches in the area corralled the name. Some claim it
Bandera "Cowboy Capital of the World" Memorial (<i>in front of courthouse</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 28, 2014
4. Bandera "Cowboy Capital of the World" Memorial (in front of courthouse)
is because Bandera has the largest per capita number of world champion cowboys, as evidenced by the monument on the courthouse lawn designed by the late artist Norma Jean Anderwald. Others point to Bandera's Great Western Trail Heritage Park and the marker commemorating Bandera's role as a starting point for cattle drives from Bandera to Dodge City, Kansas. With the establishment of Camp Verde in 1856 as a fort, Bandera Pass became a popular route to the north, somewhat protected from Indian attack by the U.S. Calvary. (Submitted on December 8, 2017, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 
 
Categories. Notable Buildings
 
Bandera County World War Memorial (<i>in front of courthouse</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 28, 2014
5. Bandera County World War Memorial (in front of courthouse)
Amasa Clark Memorial (<i>in front of courthouse</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 28, 2014
6. Amasa Clark Memorial (in front of courthouse)
Amasa Clark Memorial detail image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 28, 2014
7. Amasa Clark Memorial detail
Amasa Clark Memorial detail image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 28, 2014
8. Amasa Clark Memorial detail
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on December 18, 2017. This page originally submitted on December 8, 2017, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 79 times since then and 2 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on December 8, 2017, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.   7, 8. submitted on December 15, 2017, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
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