Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Smithsonian National Zoo in Washington, District of Columbia — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

It's Our 125th Birthday!

Smithsonian's National Zoo

 

125 Years

 
It's Our 125th Birthday! Marker image. Click for full size.
By Devry Becker Jones, December 17, 2017
1. It's Our 125th Birthday! Marker
Inscription.
The Zoo began 125 years ago out of a concern to save wildlife. The American bison was nearly extinct and other North American animals were threatened. Today, the Zoo cares for about 2,000 animals and saves species from all over the world.

William T. Hornaday, Chief Taxadermist at the Smithsonian Institution, proposed the creation of a refuge for America's vanishing animals. President Cleveland signed a bill establishing the National Zoological Park on March 2, 1889—our birthday. Note the purpose of the new zoo: "for the advancement of science and the instruction and recreation of the people." These goals still guide us today.

Captions from images:
Look throughout the Zoo for more stories about our history.

Entering the Zoo in the early 1900s meant crossing through Rock Creek.

above: The original Monkey House, 1909
left: Schoolchildren visiting the Zoo, 1898

Inside the Lion House, 1910

This exhibition has been brought to you in part by:
David Velazquez
 
Erected by Smithsonian Institution.
 
Location. 38° 55.911′ N, 77° 3.101′ W. Marker is in Smithsonian National Zoo, District of Columbia, in Washington. Marker
It's Our 125th Birthday! Marker image. Click for full size.
By Devry Becker Jones, December 17, 2017
2. It's Our 125th Birthday! Marker
is on North Road. Touch for map. On the grounds of the Smithsonian National Zoological Park. Marker is at or near this postal address: 3001 Connecticut Avenue NW, Washington DC 20008, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Feeding Times at the Zoo (a few steps from this marker); House Remodeling (within shouting distance of this marker); Meet Our Bison (within shouting distance of this marker); And Then There Were (Almost) None (within shouting distance of this marker); Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute (within shouting distance of this marker); Bison and the National Zoo (within shouting distance of this marker); Smithsonian's National Zoo (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Olmsted Walk (about 600 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Smithsonian National Zoo.
 
More about this marker. There are 2 identical markers throughout the zoo.
 
Categories. AnimalsCharity & Public Work
 
Nearly identical sign elsewhere in the Zoo, with different photos and captions image. Click for full size.
By Devry Becker Jones, December 17, 2017
3. Nearly identical sign elsewhere in the Zoo, with different photos and captions

Captions from images:
Look throughout the Zoo for more stories about our history.

Entering the Zoo in the early 1900s meant crossing through Rock Creek.

Postcard showing early Zoo buildings and scenes 1897

The original Monkey House in winter, c. 1910

Schoolchildren visiting the Zoo, 1898

This exhibition has been brought to you in part by:
Sodexo
Quality of Life Services
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on December 28, 2017. This page originally submitted on December 17, 2017, by Devry Jones of Silver Spring, Maryland. This page has been viewed 62 times since then and 8 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on December 17, 2017, by Devry Jones of Silver Spring, Maryland.   3. submitted on December 20, 2017, by Devry Jones of Silver Spring, Maryland. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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