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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
City of London, England, United Kingdom
 

Anti-Corn-Law League

 
 
Anti-Corn-Law League Marker image. Click for full size.
By Andrew Ruppenstein, October 15, 2017
1. Anti-Corn-Law League Marker
Inscription.
On this site
in the years
1844 - 1846
were situated the
London offices
of the
Anti-Corn-Law
League,
with which
John Bright
and
Richard Cobden
were so closely
associated.

 
Location. 51° 30.848′ N, 0° 6.452′ W. Marker is in City of London, England. Marker is at the intersection of Whitefriars Street and Fleet Street on Whitefriars Street. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 66 Fleet Street, City of London, England EC4Y 1HT, United Kingdom.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Two Famous Clockmakers (here, next to this marker); The Daily Express (a few steps from this marker); All the Year Round, conducted by Charles Dickens (within shouting distance of this marker); The Standard (within shouting distance of this marker); Ye Olde Cheshire Cheese (within shouting distance of this marker); Bradbury & Evans (within shouting distance of this marker); Johnson's Court (within shouting distance of this marker); British Institute of Professional Photography (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in City of London.
 
Also see . . .
1. Anti-Corn Law League (Wikipedia)
Anti-Corn-Law League Marker - Wide View image. Click for full size.
By Andrew Ruppenstein, October 15, 2017
2. Anti-Corn-Law League Marker - Wide View
The Anti-Corn-Law League marker is visible to the left of the entrance, while the Two Famous Clockmakers marker is to the right of the entrance.
. "The Anti-Corn Law League was a successful political movement in Great Britain aimed at the abolition of the unpopular Corn Laws, which protected landowners’ interests by levying taxes on imported wheat, thus raising the price of bread at a time when factory-owners were trying to cut wages. The League was a middle-class nationwide organization that held many well-attended rallies on the premise that a crusade was needed to convince parliament to repeal the corn laws. Its long-term goals included the removal of feudal privileges, which it denounced as impeding progress, lowering economic well-being, and restricting freedom. The League played little role in the final act in 1846 when Sir Robert Peel led the successful battle for repeal. However, its experience provided a model that was widely adopted in Britain and other democratic nations to demonstrate the organization of a political pressure group with the popular base....The League was founded in 1838 by Richard Cobden and John Bright. Cobden was the chief strategist; Bright was its great orator.... The League was based in Manchester and had support from numerous industrialists, especially in the textile industry. The main tactic of the League was to defeat protectionists at by-elections by concentrating its financial strength and campaign resources...." (Submitted on December 19, 2017.) 

2. The Anti-Corn Law League. (Submitted on December 19, 2017, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.)
3. The Anti-Corn Law League. (Submitted on December 19, 2017, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.)
 
Categories. Charity & Public WorkIndustry & CommercePolitics
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on December 19, 2017. This page originally submitted on December 19, 2017, by Andrew Ruppenstein of Sacramento, California. This page has been viewed 72 times since then and 9 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on December 19, 2017, by Andrew Ruppenstein of Sacramento, California.
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