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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Huntsville in Walker County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

Walker County

 
 
Walker County Marker image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 4, 2013
1. Walker County Marker
Inscription.
Formed from Montgomery County
Created April 6, 1846 --- Organized July 13, 1846

Named in honor of

Robert James Walker, 1801-1869
a distinguished citizen of
Mississippi and advocate of the
annexation of Texas
Renamed Walker County
December 10, 1863, in honor of
Captain Samuel H. Walker, 1810-1847
daring Texas Ranger
who fell in Mexico

County seat, Huntsville

 
Erected 1936 by State of Texas. (Marker Number 16106.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Texas 1936 Centennial Markers and Monuments marker series.
 
Location. 30° 43.403′ N, 95° 33.078′ W. Marker is in Huntsville, Texas, in Walker County. Marker is on Sam Houston Avenue (State Highway 75) north of 12th Street, on the right when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker is located near the sidewalk at west entrance to the Walker County Courthouse. Marker is at or near this postal address: 1100 University Avenue, Huntsville TX 77340, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Cornerstone of the Fourth Courthouse (within shouting distance of this marker); Sam Houston Whittling Site
Walker County Marker (<i>tall view</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 4, 2013
2. Walker County Marker (tall view)
(within shouting distance of this marker); Old Gibbs Store (within shouting distance of this marker); Site of First Masonic Lodge Building (within shouting distance of this marker); The Five Courthouses of Walker County (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named Walker County (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Henry Opera House (about 300 feet away); a different marker also named Sam Houston Whittling Site (about 300 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Huntsville.
 
More about this marker. Metal tablet mounted on top of pink granite pedestal.
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker.
 
Also see . . .
1. Walker County.
The area was originally named for Robert J. Walker of Mississippi, who introduced into the United States Congress the resolution for the annexation of Texas; because he was a Unionist during the Civil War, however, in 1863 the state legislature changed the honoree to Samuel H. Walker. (Submitted on December 24, 2017, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.)
Walker County Courthouse (<i>west side; view from marker</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 4, 2013
3. Walker County Courthouse (west side; view from marker)
 

2. Robert J. Walker.
Robert J. Walker, was an American lawyer, economist and politician. An active member of the Democratic Party, he served as a member of the U.S. Senate from Mississippi from 1835 until 1845, as Secretary of the Treasury from 1845 to 1849 during the administration of President James K. Polk, and briefly as Territorial Governor of Kansas in 1857. As senator, Walker vigorously supported the annexation of Texas. As Secretary of the Treasury, he held responsibility for the management of funds relating to the Mexican-American War. After his retirement from politics, Walker supported the United States during the American Civil War and continued to practice law in Washington, D.C. (Submitted on December 24, 2017, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

3. Samuel Hamilton Walker.
Samuel Hamilton Walker was a Texas Ranger captain and military officer of the Republic of Texas and the United States armies. Walker served in several armed conflicts, including the American Indian Wars and the Mexican-American wars. Walker is best known as the co-inventor of the famous Walker Colt revolver, along with arms manufacturer Samuel Colt. Walker is said to have self-funded a trip to New York City to meet with Colt and proposed to him the concept of a weapon based on the then-popular five-shot Colt Paterson revolver, with many enhancements such as adding a sixth round, being powerful enough to kill either a man or a horse with a single shot and quicker to reload. (Submitted on December 24, 2017, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 
 
Categories. Notable PlacesPatriots & Patriotism
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on December 26, 2017. This page originally submitted on December 24, 2017, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 99 times since then and 39 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on December 24, 2017, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
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