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Giddings in Lee County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

Lee County Courthouse

 
 
Lee County Courthouse Marker image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 5, 2013
1. Lee County Courthouse Marker
Inscription.
Designed by J. R. Gordon along lines similar to New York State Capitol and several buildings at Harvard University. Classified as Richardsonian Romanesque style, after the famous Louisiana-born architect Henry H. Richardson.

Built by Sonnefield, Emmins and Abright of San Antonio, 1899. Replaced first courthouse, which burned 1897. Located on crest of divide separating the Colorado and Brazos River basins.
Recorded Texas Historical Landmark – 1968

 
Erected 1968 by Texas State Historical Survey Committee. (Marker Number 8166.)
 
Location. 30° 10.889′ N, 96° 56.234′ W. Marker is in Giddings, Texas, in Lee County. Marker is on South Main Street (U.S. 77) north of East Richmond Street, on the right when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker and Texas Historical Medallion are mounted at eye-level, directly on west side of subject building, near the entrance. Marker is at or near this postal address: 200 South Main Street, Giddings TX 78942, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 6 other markers are within 10 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Lee County (within shouting distance of this marker); General Robert E. Lee / Colonel Robert E. Lee
Lee County Courthouse Marker (<i>wide view; marker visible at left, between entrance and window</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 5, 2013
2. Lee County Courthouse Marker (wide view; marker visible at left, between entrance and window)
(within shouting distance of this marker); James Goucher (approx. 3.7 miles away); Serbin (approx. 5.2 miles away); a different marker also named Serbin (approx. 5.6 miles away); Gotcher Trace (approx. 9Ĺ miles away).
 
Regarding Lee County Courthouse. Texas Historic Landmark (1968)
 
Also see . . .
1. Lee County Courthouse - Giddings.
Designed by James Riely Gordon in Romanesque Revival style, the Lee County Courthouse was completed in 1899. Its relative lack of ornamentation distinguishes it from Gordon's earlier, more lavishly decorated courthouses. Located on Main Street between Hempstead and Richmond, the courthouse is three stories tall with a clock tower with a face on each side of the building. (Submitted on December 26, 2017, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

2. Lee County Courthouse.
(includes new and old exterior and interior photos)
Lee County courthouse district courtroom - color of the walls and the painted patterns were culturally significant to the Wends, a Slavic people from eastern Germany, who were early settlers to this part of Texas. (Submitted on December 26, 2017, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

3. James Riely Gordon, architect.
His first major job was to supervise the construction of the Federal Courthouse and Post Office in San Antonio
Lee County Courthouse image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 5, 2013
3. Lee County Courthouse
(1886–89). During his career in the state, Gordon progressed from a charming and eclectic style in the Moorish manner into a highly effective Romanesque style somewhat like that of Henry Hobson Richardson. During his last years in Texas he worked in a Classical or Beaux-Arts style. At the beginning of 1903 Gordon transferred his center of operations to New York. There he had a distinguished career, which included thirteen terms as president of the New York Society of Architects. (Submitted on December 26, 2017, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

4. J. Riely Gordon, architect.
James Riely Gordon was a practicing architect during what has been called the Golden Age of Texas Courthouses, the 1880s and 1890s. By then, almost all of the 254 Texas counties now in existence had been established. A majority of Gordonís designs are in the Romanesque Revival style. The footprint of many of his buildings is in the shape of a cross, featuring a dome at the center. Under the dome is an atrium intended to provide ventilation in the Texas breeze. (Submitted on December 26, 2017, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 
 
Categories. Notable Buildings
 
Lee County Courthouse Entrance Detail image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 5, 2013
4. Lee County Courthouse Entrance Detail
Lee County Courthouse 1898 Cornerstone image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 5, 2013
5. Lee County Courthouse 1898 Cornerstone
Lee County Courthouse 1898 Cornerstone image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 5, 2013
6. Lee County Courthouse 1898 Cornerstone
Lee County Courthouse 1982 Restoration Cornerstone image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 5, 2013
7. Lee County Courthouse 1982 Restoration Cornerstone
Lee County Courthouse Clock Tower image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 5, 2013
8. Lee County Courthouse Clock Tower
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on January 9, 2018. This page originally submitted on December 26, 2017, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 72 times since then and 22 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on December 26, 2017, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.   5. submitted on January 2, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.   6, 7. submitted on December 26, 2017, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.   8. submitted on January 2, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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