Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Woodley Park in Washington, District of Columbia — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

From Woodley to Woodley Park

 
 
From Woodley to Woodley Park Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, August 15, 2015
1. From Woodley to Woodley Park Marker
Inscription. The first development called “Woodley” named after the Woodley estate (now home to the Maret School), was owned by Mrs. A. E. Kervand and was first recorded as a subdivision in 1875. Winding Woodley Lane was its main street. By 1878 lots in Woodley Park were advertised as “2 to 10 acre lots, 20 minute walk from P Street Circle; the finest Country seats ever offered for sale about the city.” But few people were enticed to move to this distant suburb.

Connecticut Avenue was extended in 1890 because of the private efforts of Senator Francis G. Newlands, who built the road to provide access to his new development of Chevy Chase. Senator Newlands, who owned the Woodley estate at the time, sought the advice of nationally known landscape architect Frederick Law Olmsted regarding development of the area. Olmstead advised that Connecticut Avenue “be regarded as the main channel of a great river, with other streets and avenues as tributaries” — which it later became.

In Woodley Park, Connecticut Avenue bisected the older subdivision, becoming its most dominant thoroughfare and entirely overriding the importance of winding Woodley Lane in the picturesque design of the suburb. After the “Million Dollar Bridge” was completed in 1907 over the deep ravines of Rock Creek Park,
From Woodley to Woodley Park Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, August 16, 2015
2. From Woodley to Woodley Park Marker
development in the area began in earnest.

The Woodley Park call boxes were developed by the Woodley Park Community Association as part of Art on Call, a program of Cultural Tourism DC with support from the DC Commission on the Arts and Humanities, the Office of the Deputy Mayor for Planning and Economic Development, and the District Department of Transportation. Local support for this call box was provided by the Woodley Park Community Association and Shapiro & Company LLC.
Visit www.woodleypark.org for map and more information.

 
Erected by Cultural Tourism DC.
 
Location. Marker has been reported missing. It was located near 38° 55.72′ N, 77° 3.444′ W. Marker was in Woodley Park, District of Columbia, in Washington. Marker was on Cathedral Avenue Northwest, on the right when traveling west. Touch for map. Marker was at or near this postal address: 2818 Cathedral Avenue Northwest, Washington DC 20008, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this location. Long & Winding Woodley Road (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Mihran Mesrobian (about 500 feet away); Redwood (about 700 feet away); Woodley Estate (approx. 0.2
Woodley Park image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, August 15, 2015
3. Woodley Park
Close-up of map on marker
miles away); Woodley Road Neighbors (approx. 0.2 miles away); Black and Gray Squirrels (approx. 0.2 miles away); A Long and Winding Road (approx. 0.2 miles away); Conservation Geography (approx. 0.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Woodley Park.
 
Categories. ArchitectureBridges & ViaductsNotable Places
 
Call Box image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, August 15, 2015
4. Call Box
Woodley image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, August 15, 2015
5. Woodley
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on January 9, 2018. This page originally submitted on August 22, 2015, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. This page has been viewed 214 times since then and 31 times this year. Last updated on January 7, 2018, by Devry Jones of Silver Spring, Maryland. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on August 22, 2015, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
Paid Advertisement