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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Chiloquin in Klamath County, Oregon — The American West (Northwest)
 

Williamson River

 
 
Williamson River Marker image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, July 3, 2017
1. Williamson River Marker
Inscription. A Pacific Railroad survey party searching for a practicable route for a railroad to connect the Sacramento Valley with the Columbia River passed near this point bound north on August 20, 1855. Lieutenant R.S. Williamson headed the party with 2nd Lieutenant Henry L. Abbot second in command. Among the officers in the army escort were Lieutenant Phil S. Sheridan and Lieutenant George Crook. Dr. J.S. Newberry was the Chief-Scientist with the survey party.
 
Erected by Oregon Department of Transportation.
 
Location. 42° 38.52′ N, 121° 52.788′ W. Marker is in Chiloquin, Oregon, in Klamath County. Marker can be reached from the intersection of U.S. 97 and Glendale Street, on the left when traveling south. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 46000 U.S. Highway 97, Crater Lake OR 97604, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 8 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Stout Abner (about 500 feet away, measured in a direct line); Collier Memorial Logging Museum (about 500 feet away); The Klamath Tribes (approx. 4.7 miles away); The First Sawmill (approx. 5.9 miles away); Ft. Klamath Frontier Post
Williamson River Marker image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, July 3, 2017
2. Williamson River Marker
(approx. 5.9 miles away); Site of Fort Klamath (approx. 5.9 miles away); Fort Klamath Military Cemetery Memorial (approx. 6.2 miles away); The Town of Fort Klamath (approx. 7.3 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Chiloquin.
 
More about this marker. The marker is located in the Collier State Park Rest Area.
 
Also see . . .
1. Pacific Railroad Surveys -- Wikipedia. The Pacific Railroad Surveys (1853–1855) consisted of ...(five)... explorations of the American West to find possible routes for a transcontinental railroad across North America. The expeditions included surveyors, scientists, and artists and resulted in an immense body of data ... on the American West. "These volumes... constitute probably the most important single contemporary source of knowledge on Western geography and history and their value is greatly enhanced by the inclusion of many beautiful plates in color of scenery, native inhabitants, fauna and flora of the Western country." Published by the United States War Department from 1855 to 1860, the surveys contained significant material on natural history, including many
Robert S. Williamson image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer
3. Robert S. Williamson
illustrations of reptiles, amphibians, birds, and mammals. In addition to describing the route, these surveys also reported on the geology, zoology, botany, paleontology of the land as well as provided ethnographic descriptions of the Native peoples encountered during the surveys.
... The fifth survey was along the Pacific coast from San Diego to Seattle, Washington conducted by Lt. Robert S. Williamson and (Lt. John) Parke.
(Submitted on January 11, 2018, by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California.) 

2. Robert S. Williamson -- Wikipedia. Robert Stockton Williamson (January 21, 1825 – November 10, 1882) was an American soldier and engineer, noted for conducting surveys for the transcontinental railroad in California and Oregon. Inducted into the Army Corps of Engineers in 1861, he had a distinguished record serving in the American Civil War... (Submitted on January 11, 2018, by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California.) 
 
Categories. Exploration
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on January 11, 2018. This page originally submitted on January 11, 2018, by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California. This page has been viewed 71 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on January 11, 2018, by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California.
 
Editor’s want-list for this marker. Nice view of the Williamson River. • Can you help?
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