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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Lodi in San Joaquin County, California — The American West (Pacific Coastal)
 

Lodi Arch

 
 
Lodi Arch Marker image. Click for full size.
By Douglass Halvorsen, March 30, 2014
1. Lodi Arch Marker
Inscription. Designed by architect E.B. Brown and built in 1907 for the Lodi Tokay Carnival, the Arch served as an entrance into Lodi and a symbol of agricultural and commercial growth. Essentially unaltered since construction, the structure is one of few remaining Mission Revival ceremonial arches left within California.

California Registered Historical Landmark No. 931
 
Erected 1981 by State Department of Parks and Recreation, City of Lodi. (Marker Number CHL-931.)
 
Location. 38° 8.043′ N, 121° 16.328′ W. Marker is in Lodi, California, in San Joaquin County. Marker is at the intersection of W Pine St and S Sacramento St, on the right when traveling east on W Pine St. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Lodi CA 95240, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Old Lodi (Mokelumne Station) (here, next to this marker); Lodi Mission Arch (a few steps from this marker); The First A&W Root Beer (within shouting distance of this marker); Hotel Lodi (about 500 feet away, measured in a direct line); City Hall, Fire House and Jail (approx.
Lodi Arch image. Click for full size.
By Douglass Halvorsen, March 30, 2014
2. Lodi Arch
0.2 miles away); Hale Park (approx. 0.2 miles away); Laura de Force Gordon (approx. 0.3 miles away); Woman's Club of Lodi (approx. 0.3 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Lodi.
 
Also see . . .  Lodi Arch (Wikipedia). (Submitted on January 23, 2018.)
 
Categories. Man-Made Features
 
Lodi Arch image. Click for full size.
By Douglass Halvorsen, March 30, 2014
3. Lodi Arch
"The Lodi Arch, also known as Mission Arch, in Lodi, California, is one of the few remaining Mission Revival ceremonial structures within the state of California. It was built in 1907 by architect E. B. Brown for the first Lodi Tokay Carnival, which still occurs annually as the Lodi Grape Festival. The following year, a California Golden Bear and a sign reading "Lodi" were added to the arch. The arch was restored in 1956 after its deteriorating condition made it a safety hazard; the golden bear was turned to the North in 1956 and has also been restored twice, in the 1940s and in 2001. In addition to its architectural significance, the arch serves as a symbol of Lodi and a focal point for the city's downtown." - Wikipedia
The Lodi Arch image. Click for full size.
Postcard image courtesy of the E.F. Mueller Postcard Collection, California State Library, 1907
4. The Lodi Arch
Taken in 1907, likely shortly after completion, given the construction debris in the vicinity. Also note the Tokay Arch behind it, no longer extant.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on January 25, 2018. This page originally submitted on January 19, 2018, by Douglass Halvorsen of Klamath Falls, Oregon. This page has been viewed 43 times since then. Last updated on January 24, 2018, by Douglass Halvorsen of Klamath Falls, Oregon. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on January 19, 2018, by Douglass Halvorsen of Klamath Falls, Oregon.   4. submitted on January 23, 2018. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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