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Bend in Deschutes County, Oregon — The American West (Northwest)
 

Location, Location & Location

Two of the Greatest Lumber Companies in the World

 

—Were Located Right here in Bend —

 
Location, Location & Location Marker image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 27, 2016
1. Location, Location & Location Marker
Inscription.
The bustling marketplace you see today, filled with shops, theaters, restaurants, entertainment and recreation was once the site of the largest pine sawmills in the country. Back in the 1920s, they were busy, noisy and dusty mills, each producing over 300,000 board feet of lumber a day.

The first lumbermen were from Minnesota. However, once the mills were in production, people from all over began migrating to Bend. A sleepy town of 536 people in 1910, Bend grew to a bustling city of 6650 by 1921. Working at the mill meant that you were part of something more than a lumber company, you were family. The lumber companies employed over 1500 people each, and by 1944, produced more than 250 million board feet of lumber annually. The lumber industry was the community's largest employer for over six decades.

Two Great Lakes lumber firms built on opposite sides of the Deschutes, upriver from Bend. Brooks-Scanlon built Mill A on the East side and Shevlin-Nixon built on the West side. Both sawmills opened within a month of each other in 1916. Because this was such an ideal location, Brooks-Scanlon decided to build the bigger, more modern Mill B in 1923. You can see remnants of Mill B when you look at the building with the three smoke stacks. Originally, those brick buildings, the powerhouse with the stacks,
Marker detail: Bend lumber mills in the 1920s image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 27, 2016
2. Marker detail: Bend lumber mills in the 1920s
the generator shop in front and the fuel building next to it, were all part of the Mill B complex.

As times changed, so did the needs of the country. Mill A closed in 1938, Shevlin-Nixon sold their holdings to Brooks-Scanlon in 1950 and, Mill B was finally closed in 1993. Over the years, the mills produced billions of board feet of lumber. The final closing of the lumber mills brought an end to an amazing era that not only created the town of Bend, but furnished the country with a superior grade of lumber for over 80 years.
 
Erected by The Old Mill District.
 
Location. 44° 2.706′ N, 121° 19.008′ W. Marker is in Bend, Oregon, in Deschutes County. Marker can be reached from SW Columbia Street east of SW Shevlin Hixon Drive when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker is located along the Deschutes River walkway, beside the foot bridge, on the west side of the river, in Bend's Old Mill District. Marker is at or near this postal address: 730 SW Columbia Street, Bend OR 97702, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Today's Old Mill District (within shouting distance of this marker); Thank Goodness for Water and Gravity (within shouting distance of this marker); Journey of the Log to Lumber
Marker detail: Lumbermen & families gathering image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 27, 2016
3. Marker detail: Lumbermen & families gathering
(about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); The Mill Transformed Trees into Highly Prized Lumber (about 500 feet away); Logs Finally Become Lumber (about 700 feet away); Old Post Office (approx. 0.9 miles away); Bend Veterans Peace Memorial (approx. 1.1 miles away); Oregon's Fabled "High Desert" (approx. 2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Bend.
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker. Old Mill District
 
Also see . . .
1. The story of Brooks Resources Corporation.
On August 18, 1915 The Bend Bulletin broke the news that “Brooks-Scanlon Will Build Here at Once.” By spring of 1916, both the Brooks-Scanlon Lumber Company and a competitor, the Shevlin-Hixon Company, were operating sawmills on opposite sides of the Deschutes River. These lumber mills, made possible by the railroad’s arrival in 1911, sparked a boom that fueled the town’s growth for the next half century. (Submitted on February 10, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

2. Brooks Resources Corporation History.
1901: Brooks-Scanlon Lumber Company organized in
Marker detail: Harry Brooks's Speech WWI image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 27, 2016
4. Marker detail: Harry Brooks's Speech WWI
Minnesota; Bend population in was 258
1916: Brooks-Scanlon and Shevlin-Hixon sawmills begin operating in Bend
1920: Bend population soars to 5,414 (Submitted on February 10, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 
 
Categories. Horticulture & ForestryIndustry & CommerceSettlements & Settlers
 
Location, Location & Location Marker (<i>wide view; Deschutes River & foot bridge in background</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 27, 2016
5. Location, Location & Location Marker (wide view; Deschutes River & foot bridge in background)
Deschutes River, Mill B Powerhouse, and Smokestacks (<i>view from near marker</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 27, 2016
6. Deschutes River, Mill B Powerhouse, and Smokestacks (view from near marker)
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on February 11, 2018. This page originally submitted on February 10, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 53 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on February 10, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. • Andrew Ruppenstein was the editor who published this page.
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