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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Seaside in Clatsop County, Oregon — The American West (Northwest)
 

The Tillamook Burn

Sunset Springs

 
 
The Tillamook Burn Marker image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, September 24, 2017
1. The Tillamook Burn Marker
Inscription. Oregon's historic Tillamook forest fire of 1933 spread over 240,000 acres of forest land. Fires in 1939 and 1945 brought the total to 355,000 acres. Over 13 billion board feet of timber were killed.
Devastation by these disastrous fires aroused Oregon voters to approve a bond issue for reforestation and protection of the burned area. Access roads were built and hazardous snags have been felled to improve forest protection. Many of these snags were sound; over seven billion board feet have been salvaged. Reforestation by planting and by aerial seeding have included Douglas Fir, Noble Fir, Sitka Spruce, Western Red Cedar and others.
A new forest will provide valuable wood and paper products, improved water storage, increased fish and wildlife and expanded outdoor recreation.
 
Erected by Oregon Travel Experience.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Oregon Beaver Boards marker series.
 
Location. 45° 47.736′ N, 123° 27.516′ W. Marker is in Seaside, Oregon, in Clatsop County. Marker is on Sunset Highway (Route 26 at milepost 28) near Olson Road. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Seaside OR 97138, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 2 other markers
The Tillamook Burn Marker image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, September 24, 2017
2. The Tillamook Burn Marker
are within walking distance of this marker. 41st Infantry Division (within shouting distance of this marker); Dennis L. Edwards Tunnel (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line).
 
More about this marker. The marker is located at the Sunset Springs Rest Area.
 
Also see . . .  Tillamook Burn - Oregon Encyclopedia. Loggers working in the area at the time offered intriguing explanations for how the fire started, but official investigation reports that have stood the test of time identified it as stemming from friction generated when a large Douglas-fir log was dragged across a downed tree. The fire started in a large area of extremely flammable logging debris at the end of a railroad spur. Within an hour, the fire burned through sixty acres of logging slash. (Submitted on February 9, 2018, by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California.) 
 
Categories. DisastersHorticulture & Forestry
 
The Tillamook Burn Marker image. Click for full size.
By Unknown
3. The Tillamook Burn Marker
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on February 27, 2018. This page originally submitted on February 9, 2018, by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California. This page has been viewed 68 times since then. Last updated on February 25, 2018, by T. Patton of Jefferson, Georgia. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on February 9, 2018, by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California.
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