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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Fremont in Rockingham County, New Hampshire — The American Northeast (New England)
 

Meeting House and Hearse House

 
 
Meeting House and Hearse House Marker image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 25, 2017
1. Meeting House and Hearse House Marker
Inscription.
Built in 1800, this steepleless structure, originally unheated, was used for both town and church meetings. This and a similar building in Rockingham, Vt., are the only two survivors of some 70 meeting houses with twin end "porches" (stairwells) built in New England in the 1700s. The building retains box pews (once privately owned) and a high pulpit. "Singing seats" in the gallery reflect the introduction of choral music in the late 1700s. The nearby hearse house (1849) marks a transition in local funerals from a hand-carried bier to a horse-drawn vehicle.
 
Erected 1991 by State of New Hampshire. (Marker Number 167.)
 
Location. 42° 58.975′ N, 71° 7.7′ W. Marker is in Fremont, New Hampshire, in Rockingham County. Marker is on Main Street (New Hampshire Route 107) mile north of Scribner Road, on the right when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker is located beside the road, directly in front of the Meeting House. Marker and Meeting house are directly across Main Street from the Fremont Village Cemetery. Marker is at or near this postal address: 464 Main Street, Fremont NH 03044, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 5 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Fremont Village Cemetery (within shouting distance
Meeting House and Hearse House Marker (<i>tall view</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 25, 2017
2. Meeting House and Hearse House Marker (tall view)
of this marker); Spaulding & Frost Cooperage (approx. 0.7 miles away); Historic Black Rocks Village / Historic Fremont, N.H.-Olde Poplin (approx. 0.8 miles away); John Prescott Lovering's Inn (approx. 0.9 miles away); Civil War Riot of 1861 (approx. 0.9 miles away); Mast Tree Riot of 1734 (approx. 2.2 miles away); 1867 (approx. 4.8 miles away); Josiah Bartlett (approx. 5 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Fremont.
 
Regarding Meeting House and Hearse House. National Register of Historic Places (1993)
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker. Only two remaining twin-porch meeting houses in the United States.
 
Also see . . .
1. Fremont Meeting House.
(This link presents many interior pictures of the Meeting house, as well as extensive interior architectural and functional details.)
The twin porches located at each end of the building contained the stairs leading to the second floor gallery. During various annual Militia Muster Days, licensed tavern
Meeting House and Hearse House Marker (<i>wide view; Meeting House in background</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 25, 2017
3. Meeting House and Hearse House Marker (wide view; Meeting House in background)
keepers used these side twin porches to sell spirituous liquors to the large assemblage of on-lookers that always attended these popular military training events. This is the only known meetinghouse in New Hampshire, and perhaps New England, that allowed liquors to be sold from the side porches of a "Town House" (a structure used for both civic and secular purposes). Town Meetings were held here between 1801 and 1911 when Fremont built a new and unique tin-sided town hall in Fremont's Black Rocks Village. (Submitted on April 1, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

2. Fremont, New Hampshire - Celebrating 250 years - 1764-2014.
This meeting house was used for town meetings between 1801 and 1911. Church services by various denominations took place here for over 65 years until the Union Church was built in Fremont Village in 1865. Wood stoves for heating the interior were not installed until 1840. (Submitted on April 1, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

3. Fremont Meeting House.
The Fremont Meeting House is a well-preserved example of a Federal-period meeting house, and is the only surviving example in the state with two porches, a once-common variant of the building type. It is one of the last in the region to be built in the old style, with the main entrance on the long side and without a steeple. The interior retains some of its original box
Meeting House (1800) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 25, 2017
4. Meeting House (1800)
pews, and its pulpit, portions of which retain original marbleized paint finish. Other surviving interior elements include some rare period music supports in the gallery. The property also includes a 19th-century hearse house. (Submitted on April 1, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 
 
Categories. ArchitectureChurches & Religion
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on April 4, 2018. This page originally submitted on April 1, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 43 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on April 1, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. • Andrew Ruppenstein was the editor who published this page.
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