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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Concord in Merrimack County, New Hampshire — The American Northeast (New England)
 

Concord Clock

 
 
Concord Clock Marker image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 25, 2017
1. Concord Clock Marker
Inscription.
Originally in the tower of the Board of Trade building at School and North Main Streets, the Concord Clock was manufactured by E. Howard Co., Boston, Massachusetts, and purchased in 1872 through public subscription. The cast steel bell, made in Sheffield, England, strikes hourly in the key of G, and was given to the City of Concord by George Pillsbury in 1873.

After years of neglect, in 1998 the clock was restored and reinstalled on this site for the people of Concord by the New Hampshire Historical Society.
 
Erected 1998 by New Hampshire Historical Society.
 
Location. 43° 12.411′ N, 71° 32.18′ W. Marker is in Concord, New Hampshire, in Merrimack County. Marker is at the intersection of North Main Street (U.S. 3) and Capitol Street, on the right when traveling north on North Main Street. Touch for map. Marker is a metal plaque mounted at eye level directly on a supporting pillar of the clock tower exhibit. The clock tower exhibit is on the west side of North Main Street, at the entrance to Eagle Square. Marker is at or near this postal address: 90 North Main Street, Concord NH 03301, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Main Street's Origins (a few steps from this marker); Isaac A. Hill
Concord Clock Marker (<i>wide view; marker visible on pillar supporting clock exhibit</i>) image. Click for full size.
2. Concord Clock Marker (wide view; marker visible on pillar supporting clock exhibit)
(a few steps from this marker); Site of Home of Isaac Hill (a few steps from this marker); Concord's Architectural Heritage (within shouting distance of this marker); State House Grounds (within shouting distance of this marker); Franklin Pierce (within shouting distance of this marker); In Grateful Tribute (within shouting distance of this marker); Dedicated to You, A Free Citizen in a Free Land (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Concord.
 
Also see . . .  The Clock Tower.
After World War II, the bell of history tolled for Concord’s bright and vibrant downtown. Residents dismissed the commercial buildings as “old brick shells,” and one consultant labeled North Main Street an “unsightly canyon." In 1950, two stories were lopped off of the top of the Board of Trade building, and the floors that survived received a Colonial remodeling. The parts of the clock were lost. McGowan, who filled the entrance to Eagle Square with scraps of historic architecture, scoured the country for the old clock. The bell was found in a Michigan flea market. Volunteers
Concord Clock (<i>mechanism detail - inside glass case</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 25, 2017
3. Concord Clock (mechanism detail - inside glass case)
raised $150,000 for its preservation, and the clock and bell were installed in a brick, copper and glass tower designed by architect F. Duene Cowan. On Dec. 18, 1998, some 125 years since the clock first came to Concord and 48 years after its removal, the hands moved and the bell tolled once more. (Submitted on April 3, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 
 
Categories. Man-Made Features
 
Concord Clock (<i>mechanism detail - inside glass case</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 25, 2017
4. Concord Clock (mechanism detail - inside glass case)
Concord Clock Bell image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., May 15, 2018
5. Concord Clock Bell
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on May 20, 2018. This page originally submitted on April 3, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 90 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on April 3, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.   5. submitted on May 20, 2018, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania. • Andrew Ruppenstein was the editor who published this page.
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