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City of London, England, United Kingdom
 

The London Wall Walk - 14

 
 
The London Wall Walk - 14 Marker image. Click for full size.
By Andrew Ruppenstein, March 20, 2018
1. The London Wall Walk - 14 Marker
Inscription. The London Wall Walk follows the line of the City Wall from the Tower of London to the Museum of London. The Walk is 1 3/4 miles (2.8km) long and is marked by twenty-one panels which can be followed in either direction. The City Wall was built by the Romans c AD 200. During the Saxon period it fell into decay. From the 12th to 17th centuries large sections of the Roman Wall and gates were repaired or rebuilt. From the 17th century, as London expanded rapidly in size, the Wall was no longer necessary for defence. During the 18th century demolition of parts of the Wall began, and by the 19th century most of the Wall had disappeared. Only recently have several sections again become visible.

City Wall and Towers

This section of the Wall originally formed the northern side of the Roman fort, built c AD 120. The defences were completely rebuilt in the early medieval period and most of the surviving stonework dates to this time. The modern lake indicates the approximate position of the medieval ditch, which then contained a 'great store of verie good fish, of diverse sorts.' In the 13th century a series of towers was added to the outside of the Wall and the remains of two such towers survive here. The battlements in this section were rebuilt in brick probably in the late 15th century as at St Alphege. From the early

The London Wall Walk - 14 Marker - Wide View image. Click for full size.
By Andrew Ruppenstein, March 20, 2018
2. The London Wall Walk - 14 Marker - Wide View
A section of the wall is visible to the left of the marker, behind and beyond the railings.
medieval period there grew up a suburb outside the Wall around the church of St Giles founded c 1090. After the ditch was filled in during the 17th century the City Wall became the southern boundary of the churchyard. This ensured the survival of the Wall until 1803 when, 'by reason of the frequent nuisances committed by some of the louest class of people, who had been suffered to inhabit the adjoining premises', it was demolished.
 
Erected 1984 by Museum of London. (Marker Number 14.)
 
Location. 51° 31.11′ N, 0° 5.63′ W. Marker is in City of London, England. Marker can be reached from the intersection of Wood Street and Fore Street. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: City of London, England EC2Y 8DA, United Kingdom.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Cripplegate (within shouting distance of this marker); Site of First Bomb Hit (within shouting distance of this marker); The London Wall Walk – 15 (within shouting distance of this marker); London City Wall - Bastion 13 (about 90 meters away, measured in a direct line); London City Wall - Bastion 14 (about 120 meters away); The Salters Garden
The London Wall Walk - Tower and Wall image. Click for full size.
By Andrew Ruppenstein, March 20, 2018
3. The London Wall Walk - Tower and Wall
Looking east, with the tower and wall on the right side of the moat, with the marker (not visible because it is flat to the railings) on the left side of the moat.
(about 120 meters away); The London Wall Walk – 18 (about 120 meters away); William Shakespeare (about 180 meters away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in City of London.
 
More about this marker. The marker is located on the south side of St. Giles Cripplegate Church, reachable via the walkway (St. Giles Terrace - follow the signs).
 
Also see . . .  London Wall (Wikipedia). "The London Wall was the defensive wall first built by the Romans around Londinium, their strategically important port town on the River Thames in what is now London, England, and subsequently maintained until the 18th century....It is now the name of a road in the City of London running along part of the course of the old wall between Wormwood Street and the Rotunda junction where St. Martin's Le Grand meets Aldersgate Street. Until the later Middle Ages the wall defined the boundaries of the City of London." (Submitted on April 7, 2018.) 
 
Categories. Forts, Castles
 
The London Wall Walk - Detail image. Click for full size.
1812
4. The London Wall Walk - Detail
The battlements of the City Wall in the churchyard of St Giles, as they appeared in 1793 shortly before demolition.
The London Wall Walk - Detail image. Click for full size.
By Graham Evernden
5. The London Wall Walk - Detail
An artistic rendering of the wall as it would look if it were to be reconstructed upon the remnants visible from the marker.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on April 7, 2018. This page originally submitted on April 7, 2018, by Andrew Ruppenstein of Sacramento, California. This page has been viewed 75 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on April 7, 2018, by Andrew Ruppenstein of Sacramento, California.
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