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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
North Bennington in Bennington County, Vermont — The American Northeast (New England)
 

Railroad Station

North Bennington, Vermont

 
 
Railroad Station Marker image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, July 11, 2017
1. Railroad Station Marker
Inscription.
The North Bennington Railroad Station was constructed in 1880, replacing an earlier wood frame station located on the same site. For over half a century, the depot served as the gateway to the village. Beginning in the 1930’s, with the gradual decline in the Rutland Railroad’s passenger service, the structure fell into disrepair. In 1971, Ethel (Babe) Scott McCullough and her husband, William R. Scott sponsored restoration of the building. It has been in use since that time as the Village seat of government. In 1996, the village obtained an enhancement grant from the Department of Transportation to again restore the building to Mr. & Mrs. Scott’s vision.
 
Location. 42° 55.935′ N, 73° 14.542′ W. Marker is in North Bennington, Vermont, in Bennington County. Marker can be reached from the intersection of Buckley Road (Vermont Route 67) and Depot Street, on the right when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker is a metal plaque mounted at eye-level, directly on the subject building, near the northwest corner of the building. Marker is in this post office area: North Bennington VT 05257, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 4 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Park-McCullough House (approx. ¼ mile away); Home Where Lt .Colonel Baum Died
Railroad Station Marker (<i>wide view; marker is visible near the left edge [northwest corner]</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, July 11, 2017
2. Railroad Station Marker (wide view; marker is visible near the left edge [northwest corner])
(approx. 1.4 miles away); Henry Covered Bridge (approx. 1½ miles away); Birthplace of Vermont (approx. 1.6 miles away); Walloomsac M.E. Church (approx. 2.6 miles away in New York); Bennington Battlefield (approx. 3.1 miles away in New York); New Hampshire Troops (approx. 3.1 miles away in New York); “the first link in the chain of successes which issued in the surrender at Saratoga ...” (approx. 3.2 miles away in New York).
 
More about this marker. The former North Bennington Railroad Depot and parking lot are directly across Buckley Road from the North Bennington Post Office.
 
Regarding Railroad Station. National Register of Historic Places (1973)
 
Also see . . .  North Bennington Depot.
Built in 1880 as a passenger station, this Second Empire brick building is a surviving reminder of North Bennington's former importance as a major railroad hub in southwestern Vermont. It is set on the south side of railroad track operated by the Vermont Railway, and just west of a junction with a spur line leading to downtown Bennington. In the 19th century, North Bennington developed as a
North Bennington Railroad Station (<i>view from railroad tracks; modern sculpture front & right</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, July 11, 2017
3. North Bennington Railroad Station (view from railroad tracks; modern sculpture front & right)
major railway junction, joining the Rutland Railroad with lines serving New York and Massachusetts. (Submitted on April 24, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 
 
Categories. Notable PersonsRailroads & Streetcars
 
North Bennington Railroad Station (<i>front view from parking lot</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, July 11, 2017
4. North Bennington Railroad Station (front view from parking lot)
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on April 25, 2018. This page originally submitted on April 24, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 57 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on April 24, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. • Andrew Ruppenstein was the editor who published this page.
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