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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Gulf Shores in Baldwin County, Alabama — The American South (East South Central)
 

Post Hospital Complex

 
 
Post Hospital Complex Marker image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 18, 2014
1. Post Hospital Complex Marker
Inscription.
On February 28, 1899, the U.S. Army completed construction of the post Hospital for the garrison of Fort Morgan. At a cost of $7,500.00, the original structure consisted of a two story modern medical facility that was heated by mineral oil. Due to the continual increase of the quantity of men at the post, the structure was modified and expanded in March 1908. On January 22, 1919, the Post Hospital was completely destroyed by an out of control grease fire in the hospital's kitchen. With the costly financial loss of the structure's destruction and the substantial reduction in the quantity of soldiers in the Army after the end of WWI, the Army opted not to rebuild the Post Hospital and abandoned the site.

Completed on February 28, 1899 at a cost of $1,700.00, the Hospital Steward's Quarters was constructed from a standard U.S. Army plan utilized at Army posts across the country. The original plans included a front parlor, dining area, two bedrooms, a second story wash closet, a porch that wrapped around three sides of the house, and a detached kitchen directly behind the house which was accessed by the back porch. However, the house constructed differed from the standard plan by eliminating the side porch and by offsetting the kitchen to take advantage of the bay breezes to help cool the kitchen.
 
Erected by
Marker detail: Fort Morgan Post Hospital as viewed from the Northeast image. Click for full size.
2. Marker detail: Fort Morgan Post Hospital as viewed from the Northeast
The side of the Hospital Steward's Quarters can be seen at the extreme right of the photograph.
Fort Morgan State Historic Site.
 
Location. 30° 13.9′ N, 88° 0.871′ W. Marker is near Gulf Shores, Alabama, in Baldwin County. Marker can be reached from Fort Morgan Road (Alabama Route 180) 1.2 miles west of Dune Road, on the right when traveling west. Touch for map. Marker is located within the Fort Morgan State Historic Site, along the pedestrian walkway, directly in front of the Hospital Steward's Quarters exhibit. Marker is at or near this postal address: 51 AL-180, Gulf Shores AL 36542, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. "Damn The Torpedoes!" The Campaigns for Mobile, 1864 - 1865 (within shouting distance of this marker); Here ends the Alabama Scenic River Trail (within shouting distance of this marker); Peace Magazine (1902-1924) (about 800 feet away, measured in a direct line); Battery Dearborn (1900-1924) (approx. 0.2 miles away); Officer’s Row (approx. ¼ mile away); The Battery Lincoln (approx. ¼ mile away); "The Shells Were Bursting All Around Us" (approx. 0.3 miles away); Colors of Significance: Historic Flags of Mobile Point (approx. half a mile away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Gulf Shores.
 
Also see . . .
1. The "Modern" Era at Fort Morgan. Beginning in 1895 the U.S. Army Corps
Marker detail: Hospital Steward's Quarters circa 1908 image. Click for full size.
3. Marker detail: Hospital Steward's Quarters circa 1908
The offset kitchen can clearly be seen in the left background.
of Engineers began construction of a new fortification system at Fort Morgan. Reinforced concrete batteries replaced the old brick fort as the main fortification protecting Mobile Bay. During time of war, electrically detonated under water mines protected the entrance to Mobile Bay. Between 1900 and 1923, Fort Morgan became the largest permanent military base in Alabama with a garrison of over four hundred Coast Artillery soldiers. Over one hundred structures were build by the U.S. Army Quartermaster Department to support the coast defense mission. (Submitted on April 30, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

2. Fort Morgan, Mobile Bay. No wooden structures from the Civil War era remain at Fort Morgan. The oldest building on site is the lighthouse keeper’s house, built in 1872. The five remaining wooden buildings on the site date to the beginning of the 20th century. The military base was greatly expanded between 1898 and 1910, and the surviving buildings are all that remain of a large support complex that at its peak numbered almost 100 structures. The buildings still standing were originally designed to house a coast artillery officer’s quarters, a staff officer’s quarters, a hospital steward’s quarters, the post bakery, and the post administration building. The wooden buildings are intact,
Post Hospital Complex Marker (<i>wide view; Hospital Steward's Quarters in background</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 18, 2014
4. Post Hospital Complex Marker (wide view; Hospital Steward's Quarters in background)
and in very good condition. (Submitted on April 30, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

3. Fort Morgan State Historic Site. Since 1834, Fort Morgan has stood as the guardian of Mobile Bay. The fort was active during four wars — the Civil War, the Spanish-American War and World Wars I and II. The fort is most famous for its role in the Civil War Battle of Mobile Bay. The 479-acre site contains concrete artillery batteries constructed between 1895 and 1904 and historic military buildings dating from 1899 to 1910. (Submitted on April 30, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 
 
Categories. DisastersForts, Castles
 
Hospital Steward's Quarters image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 18, 2014
5. Hospital Steward's Quarters
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on August 25, 2018. This page originally submitted on April 30, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 80 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on April 30, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
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