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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Hempstead in Waller County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

Gen. George and Libbie Custer Campsite

 
 
Gen. George and Libbie Custer Campsite Marker image. Click for full size.
By Frederick Bothwell, May 27, 2018
1. Gen. George and Libbie Custer Campsite Marker
Inscription. Soon after the Civil War General George Armstrong Custer and his cavalry unit arrived in Texas as part of a large U.S. force sent to establish order and counter the threat posed by French-controlled Mexico. From August to October, 1865, Custer, his wife Elizabeth (Libbie), and several U.S. Cavalry units camped here on the Liendo plantation of Leonard W. Groce, heir of "Old 300" settler and cotton baron Jared Groce. The Custers enjoyed warm relations with the Groces and area Texans in part because of his insistence that federal troops treat Texans and their property with respect.
Sesquicentennial of Texas Statehood 1845-1995

 
Erected 1994 by Texas Historical Commission. (Marker Number 9380.)
 
Location. 30° 6.446′ N, 96° 1.709′ W. Marker is near Hempstead, Texas, in Waller County. Marker is on Wyatt Chapel Road 0.3 miles east of Farm to Market Road 1488, on the right when traveling east. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: Liendo Plantation, Hempstead TX 77445, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 5 other markers are within 11 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Clear Creek Confederate War Camps (approx. 1.8 miles away); Groce Family Plantations
Custer Campsite Marker image. Click for full size.
By Frederick Bothwell, May 27, 2018
2. Custer Campsite Marker
The marker is on a hillside, in back of a cluster of white mailboxes marked Liendo Plantation.
(approx. 1.8 miles away); Ahrenbeck-Urban Home (approx. 3.4 miles away); Primus Kelly (approx. 8.8 miles away); Early Texas River Steamers (approx. 10.2 miles away).
 
Categories. Military
 
Custer Marker Site image. Click for full size.
By Frederick Bothwell, May 27, 2018
3. Custer Marker Site
The marker is about 30 feet from the pavement on the south side of Wyatt Chapel Road and can be approached on foot.
Tenting on the Plains, by Elizabeth Custer image. Click for full size.
By Frederick Bothwell, July 31, 2018
4. Tenting on the Plains, by Elizabeth Custer
In Chapters V and VI of the book, Libby describes the highlights of life at the Custer’s Hempstead encampment, en route to Austin: “At Hempstead we halted, and the General made a permanent camp…. The stream on which we had encamped was wide and deep and had a current. Our tents were on the bank, which gently sloped to the water. We had one open at both ends, over which was built a shade of pine boughs…We encamped on an unused part of the plantation of the oldest resident of Texas, who came forth with a welcome and offers of hospitality….His wife sent me over a few things to make our tent habitable, as I suppose her husband told her that our furniture consisted of a bucket and 2 camp stools. There’s no denying that I sank down into one of the chairs, which had a back, with a sense of enjoyment of what seems to me the greatest luxury I had ever known… the old neighbor continued his kindness which was returned by sending him game after the general’s hunt and protecting his estate. He gave us dogs and sent us vegetables and spent many hours under our shade…. We had long and delightful rides over the level country.”
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on August 8, 2018. This page originally submitted on May 26, 2018, by Frederick Bothwell of Georgetown, Texas. This page has been viewed 72 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on May 27, 2018, by Frederick Bothwell of Georgetown, Texas.   4. submitted on July 31, 2018, by Frederick Bothwell of Georgetown, Texas. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
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