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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Staunton, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

The Wesleyan Female Institute

 
 
The Wesleyan Female Institute Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, September 24, 2008
1. The Wesleyan Female Institute Marker
Inscription. The Wesleyan Female Institute stood on this site from 1850–1870.
 
Location. 38° 8.963′ N, 79° 4.5′ W. Marker is in Staunton, Virginia. Marker is on West Beverly Street (Virginia Route 254) east of Church Street, on the left when traveling east. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Staunton VA 24401, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Trinity Church (within shouting distance of this marker); Dr. Alexander Humphreys (within shouting distance of this marker); The Hon. Archibald Stuart (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Ast Building (about 400 feet away); Augusta National Bank Building (about 600 feet away); Stuart Hall (about 600 feet away); T. J. Collins & Son (about 700 feet away); a different marker also named Dr. Alexander Humphreys (about 800 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Staunton.
 
Additional comments.
1. Wesleyan Female Institute during the Civil War
During the Federal occupation of Staunton in June 1864, the mayor of Staunton (N.K. Trout) and other members of the town council, with Alexander H.H. Stuart as well as the superintendent of the "lunatic asylum," the principal
Site of The Wesleyan Female Institute image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, September 24, 2008
2. Site of The Wesleyan Female Institute
Marker is on the brick wall, on the right. Site is across from Trinity Church. The back of the Central United Methodist Church, which faces Lewis Street, is in the distance.
of the Wesleyan Female Institute and several other prominent men of the town demanded an audience with Col. David Hunter Strother of Genl. David Hunter's staff. While these leaders urged that private property be protected, Strother made it clear that he would adhere to the policies of "warring according to the rules of civilized nations." Private schools and charitable organizations would be protected.
    — Submitted March 17, 2009, by Robert H. Moore, II of Winchester, Virginia.

 
Categories. Education
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on September 26, 2008, by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia. This page has been viewed 1,185 times since then and 37 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on September 26, 2008, by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia.
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