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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Bacon Level in Randolph County, Alabama — The American South (East South Central)
 

Pottery-Making Families of Randolph County / Early Pottery Shops of Randolph County

 
 
Pottery-Making Families of Randolph County marker image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, June 2, 2018
1. Pottery-Making Families of Randolph County marker
Inscription.
Pottery-Making Families of Randolph County

During the 1830s, pottery-making families moved directly from the Carolinas and Georgia. Most came from the Edgefield District of western South Carolina, which boasted an important pottery-making center. Well-known Edgefield potters who were in the 1840 U.S. Census for Randolph County, Alabama, included Matthew Duncan, John, Holland and Robert Leopard and James Prothro. Other prominent potters of the antebellum period were Cyrus Cogburn, Job Falkner, Cicero D. Hudson, Elijah McPherson, Greenberry Morton, Joseph Rushton, James Pinckney Shepherd, Milton J. Ussery, and Robert Ussery. During this period, enslaved African-American potters also worked in Randolph County. After the Civil War, John Barnes, John Lehman, and Zachariah T. Ussery were important potters. Many other local families became involved in pottery making including members of the Belcher, Boggs, Boyd, Brown, Foster, Gladney, Mapp, Meacham, Muldrew, Oliver, Phillips, Pittman, Pound, Swet, Spears, Taylor, Weathers, Williams and Yates families. (Continued)

Early Pottery Shops of Randolph County

Pottery-making families were among the first settlers to come to this portion of east central Alabama after the acquisition of the Creek Indian lands in 1832. The earliest
Early Pottery Shops of Randolph County Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, June 2, 2018
2. Early Pottery Shops of Randolph County Marker
of these pottery shops were located here in Bacon Level and in nearby Cedric and Hickory Flat (Chambers County). These local potters produced the stoneware storage jars, jugs, churns and other pottery essentials for life on the frontier of early nineteenth-century Alabama. Their wares were coated with alkaline glaze made from wood ashes or lime which produced a green glassy finish that made the pottery both durable and suitable for food storage. The alkaline glaze was the predominant southern stoneware glaze and was brought to Randolph County by potters who emigrated from North Carolina, Georgia and South Carolina. Potters from Randolph County who moved west with the American frontier established potteries in Elmore, DeKalb, Perry and Shelby counties in Alabama as well as in Mississippi and Texas. (Continued)
 
Erected 2018 by the Randolph County Historical Society.
 
Location. 33° 7.746′ N, 85° 17.476′ W. Marker is in Bacon Level, Alabama, in Randolph County. Marker is at the intersection of County Road 16 and Bacon Cove Road (County Road 75), on the right when traveling south on County Road 16. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Roanoke AL 36274, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 16 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies
View of marker looking south on County Road 75. image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, June 2, 2018
3. View of marker looking south on County Road 75.
. Wehadkee Yarn Mills (approx. 2.1 miles away); Pottery Shops in Rock Mills / The Potters of Rock Mills (approx. 2.2 miles away); Roanoke Doll Factory (approx. 4.9 miles away); Lebanon Christian Church (approx. 5.4 miles away); The Burnt Village (was approx. 11 miles away in Georgia but has been reported missing. ); Famous Indian Path (approx. 13 miles away in Georgia); Benjamin Hawkins (approx. 15.1 miles away in Georgia); Heard County Jail (approx. 15.3 miles away in Georgia).
 
Also see . . .
1. The Randolph Leader news article on the placement of the marker. (Submitted on June 3, 2018, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama.)
2. Wikipedia article on Bacon Level and its pottery industry. (Submitted on June 3, 2018, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama.)
 
Categories. African AmericansIndustry & CommerceSettlements & Settlers
 
Looking north on County Road 16 image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, June 2, 2018
4. Looking north on County Road 16
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 3, 2018. This page originally submitted on June 2, 2018, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama. This page has been viewed 79 times since then. Photos:   1. submitted on June 2, 2018, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama.   2, 3, 4. submitted on June 3, 2018, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama.
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