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City of London, England, United Kingdom
 

The London Wall Walk – 15

 
 
The London Wall Walk – 15 Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, May 2, 2018
1. The London Wall Walk – 15 Marker
Inscription.
The London Wall Walk follows the line of the City Wall from the Tower of London to the Museum of London. The Walk is 1¾ miles (2.8km) long and is marked by twenty-one panels which can be followed in either direction. The City Wall was built by the Romans c AD 200. During the Saxon period it fell into decay. From the 12th to 17th centuries large sections of the Roman Wall and gates were repaired or rebuilt. From the 17th century, as London expanded rapidly in size, the Wall was no longer necessary for defence. During the 18th century demolition of parts of the Wall began, and by the 19th century most of the Wall had disappeared. Only recently have several sections again become visible.

St Giles Cripplegate, Tower
This medieval tower marks the north-west corner of the Roman and medieval defences. Most of the Roman Wall was completely rebuilt in the early medieval period. In 1211-13 a new defensive ditch was dug around the outside of the Wall and soon after a series of towers was added along its western side. This tower survives to two-thirds of its original height. It would have had wooden floors.

In peacetime the towers were rented for a variety of uses and some were occupied by hermits. This tower may have been used for this purpose since in the 13th century the hermitage of St James in the Wall
The London Wall Walk – 15 Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, May 2, 2018
2. The London Wall Walk – 15 Marker
was built nearby. In 1872, when the area was redeveloped, the crypt of the hermitage chapel was removed to Mark Lane where it still survives.

Although the City ditch was eventually filled in and the churchyard of St Giles was extended up to the Wall, the tower survived. It became almost buried in earth dumped to raise the level of the churchyard, but was uncovered during the Barbican redevelopment of the 1960s. (Marker Number 15.)
 
Location. 51° 31.104′ N, 0° 5.695′ W. Marker is in City of London, England. Marker can be reached from the intersection of London Wall and Noble Street, on the right when traveling west. Touch for map. Located along the Roman Wall beginning near the London Wall Car Park, near the Museum of London. Marker is in this post office area: City of London, England EC2Y 5BL, United Kingdom.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. London City Wall - Bastion 13 (a few steps from this marker); London City Wall - Bastion 14 (within shouting distance of this marker); The London Wall Walk - 14 (within shouting distance of this marker); The London Wall Walk – 18 (about 90 meters away, measured in a direct line); Cripplegate (about
The London Wall Walk – 15 Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, May 2, 2018
3. The London Wall Walk – 15 Marker
120 meters away); William Shakespeare (about 120 meters away); St. Olave Silver Street (about 150 meters away); Site of First Bomb Hit (about 150 meters away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in City of London.
 
Also see . . .
1. London’s Roman City Wall. (Submitted on June 3, 2018, by Michael Herrick of Southbury, Connecticut.)
2. London Wall on Wikipedia. (Submitted on June 3, 2018, by Michael Herrick of Southbury, Connecticut.)
 
Categories. Forts, Castles
 
The London Wall Walk – 15 Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, May 2, 2018
4. The London Wall Walk – 15 Marker
The remains of a Roman London Wall Tower just around the corner from the marker.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on July 26, 2018. This page originally submitted on June 3, 2018, by Michael Herrick of Southbury, Connecticut. This page has been viewed 42 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on June 3, 2018, by Michael Herrick of Southbury, Connecticut.
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